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Ben Guy Phillips

Personal Details

First Name:Ben
Middle Name:Guy
Last Name:Phillips
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RePEc Short-ID:pph76

Research output

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Jump to: Articles

Articles

  1. Annie Abello & Sharyn Lymer & Laurie Brown & Ann Harding & Ben Phillips, 2008. "Enhancing the Australian National Health Survey Data for Use in a Microsimulation Model of Pharmaceutical Drug Usage and Cost," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 11(3), pages 1-2.
  2. Ann Harding & Annie Abello & Laurie Brown & Ben Phillips, 2004. "Distributional Impact of Government Outlays on the Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme in 2001-02," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(s1), pages 83-96, September.
  3. Laurie Brown & Annie Abello & Ben Phillips & Ann Harding, 2004. "Moving towards an Improved Microsimulation Model of the Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 37(1), pages 41-61, March.
  4. Ann Harding & Neil Warren & Gillian Beer & Ben Phillips & Kwabena Osei, 2002. "The Distributional Impact of Selected Commonwealth Outlays and Taxes and Alternative Commonwealth Grant Allocation Mechanisms," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 35(3), pages 325-334.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Articles

  1. Annie Abello & Sharyn Lymer & Laurie Brown & Ann Harding & Ben Phillips, 2008. "Enhancing the Australian National Health Survey Data for Use in a Microsimulation Model of Pharmaceutical Drug Usage and Cost," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 11(3), pages 1-2.

    Cited by:

    1. Sharyn Lymer & Laurie Brown & Ann Harding & Alicia Payne, 2011. "Challenges and Solutions in Constructing a Microsimulation Model of the Use and Costs of Medical Services in Australia," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 4(3), pages 17-31.
    2. Eugenio Zucchelli & Andrew M Jones & Nigel Rice, 2012. "The evaluation of health policies through dynamic microsimulation methods," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 5(1), pages 2-20.
    3. Zucchelli, E & Jones, A.M & Rice, N, 2010. "The evaluation of health policies through microsimulation methods," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 10/03, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.

  2. Ann Harding & Annie Abello & Laurie Brown & Ben Phillips, 2004. "Distributional Impact of Government Outlays on the Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme in 2001-02," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 80(s1), pages 83-96, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Linping Xiong & Xiuqiang Ma, 2007. "Forecasting China's Medical Insurance Policy for Urban Employees Using a Microsimulation Model," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 10(1), pages 1-8.
    2. Annie Abello & Sharyn Lymer & Laurie Brown & Ann Harding & Ben Phillips, 2008. "Enhancing the Australian National Health Survey Data for Use in a Microsimulation Model of Pharmaceutical Drug Usage and Cost," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 11(3), pages 1-2.

  3. Laurie Brown & Annie Abello & Ben Phillips & Ann Harding, 2004. "Moving towards an Improved Microsimulation Model of the Australian Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 37(1), pages 41-61, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Linping Xiong & Xiuqiang Ma, 2007. "Forecasting China's Medical Insurance Policy for Urban Employees Using a Microsimulation Model," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 10(1), pages 1-8.
    2. Xiong Linping & Tang Weidong & Liu Hong, 2011. "Constructing a Basefile for Simulating Kunming’s Medical Insurance Scheme of Urban Employees," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 4(3), pages 3-16.
    3. Sharyn Lymer & Laurie Brown & Ann Harding & Alicia Payne, 2011. "Challenges and Solutions in Constructing a Microsimulation Model of the Use and Costs of Medical Services in Australia," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 4(3), pages 17-31.
    4. Ann Harding & Robert Tanton, 2014. "Policy and people at the small-area level: using micro-simulation to create synthetic spatial data," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research Methods and Applications in Spatially Integrated Social Science, chapter 25, pages 560-586 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Corrections

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