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Carrie Lauren Conaway

This is information that was supplied by Carrie Conaway in registering through RePEc. If you are Carrie Lauren Conaway , you may change this information at the RePEc Author Service. Or if you are not registered and would like to be listed as well, register at the RePEc Author Service. When you register or update your RePEc registration, you may identify the papers and articles you have authored.

Personal Details

First Name:Carrie
Middle Name:Lauren
Last Name:Conaway
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pco133
Email:
Homepage:http://www.bos.frb.org/economic/econbios/conaway.htm
Postal Address:
Phone:
Location: Boston, Massachusetts (United States)
Homepage: http://www.bos.frb.org/economic/
Email:
Phone: 617-973-3397
Fax: 617-973-4221
Postal: P.O. Box 2076, Boston, Massachusetts 02106-2076
Handle: RePEc:edi:efrbous (more details at EDIRC)
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  1. Carrie Conaway, 2005. "Paying the price: how family choices affect career outcomes," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 1, pages 26-29.
  2. Carrie Conaway, 2005. "Where does the time go?," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 1, pages 30-31.
  3. Carrie Conaway, 2005. "A psychological effect of stereotypes," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 1, pages 40-41.
  4. Carrie Conaway, 2004. "Objects of desire: creating legacies, one collection at a time," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 4 2003 , pages 10-19.
  5. Carrie Conaway, 2003. "Like father, like son: have we changed our penny-pinching ways?," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 2, pages 24-30.
  6. Carrie Conaway, 2003. "Accidents will happen: so what improves workplace safety?," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 3, pages 11-19.
  7. Carrie Conaway, 2003. "Too much of a good thing can be bad: the pros and cons of pharmaceutical patents," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 1, pages 10-18.
  8. Carrie Conaway, 2002. "Observations: weathering the bills," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 4, pages 2.
  9. Carrie Conaway, 2002. "Chances aren't," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 3, pages 24-30.
  10. Carrie Conaway, 2002. "Preserving our past: who should bear the cost of history?," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 2, pages 14-21.
  11. Carrie Conaway, 2002. "Doing well by doing time?: at their best, prisons can help inmates leave more employable than when they arrived: but most aren't there yet," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 4, pages 20-30.
  12. Carrie Conaway, 2002. "Virtual university: is online learning changing higher education?," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 1, pages 6-13.
  13. Carrie Conaway, 2001. "Diagnosis: shortage," Regional Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Q 3, pages 7 - 15.
2 papers by this author were announced in NEP, and specifically in the following field reports (number of papers):
  1. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (2) 2006-03-18 2006-07-09. Author is listed

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