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Social Dynamics

Editor

Listed:
  • Steven N. Durlauf
    ()

    (University of Wisconsin)

  • H. Peyton Young
    ()

    (University of Oxford)

Abstract

Economists have traditionally studied aggregate behavior as the outcome of individual decisions made interactively, while sociologists have focused on the role of social influences on individual behavior. Over the past decade, however, the barriers between the disciplines have broken down, resulting in the new area of social economics. Social economics is based on the assumption that individuals are directly influenced by the choices and characteristics of others, creating a feedback loop from the past choices of some people to the current social context and hence future choices of others. The essays in this book, by some of the creators of the field, provide an overview of social economics and represent a variety of approaches, including theoretical model-building, empirical studies, statistical analyses, and philosophical reflections.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven N. Durlauf & H. Peyton Young (ed.), 2004. "Social Dynamics," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262541769, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtp:titles:0262541769
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alberto Alesina & Enrico Spolaore, 1997. "On the Number and Size of Nations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 112(4), pages 1027-1056.
    2. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth through Creative Destruction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(2), pages 323-351, March.
    3. Robert J. Barro, 1991. "Economic Growth in a Cross Section of Countries," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 407-443.
    4. Barro, Robert J. & Lee, Jong-Wha, 1993. "International comparisons of educational attainment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 363-394, December.
    5. Kenneth J. Arrow, 1962. "The Economic Implications of Learning by Doing," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 29(3), pages 155-173.
    6. Alesina, Alberto & Summers, Lawrence H, 1993. "Central Bank Independence and Macroeconomic Performance: Some Comparative Evidence," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 25(2), pages 151-162, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Crandall, Mindy S. & Weber, Bruce A., 2005. "Trickling Down: Does Local Job Growth Reduce Poverty?," Working Papers 18915, Oregon State University, Rural Poverty Research Center (RPRC).
    2. Crandall, Mindy S. & Weber, Bruce A., 2005. "Poverty In The West: Changing Fortunes From 1990-2000," Western Economics Forum, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 4(01).
    3. Mark Guzman & Joseph Haslag & Pia Orrenius, 2008. "On the determinants of optimal border enforcement," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 34(2), pages 261-296, February.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    social economics; feedback loop;

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • B59 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Current Heterodox Approaches - - - Other
    • D7 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making

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