IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/b/mtp/titles/0262122219.html
   My bibliography  Save this book

Technology and Productivity: The Korean Way of Learning and Catching Up

Author

Listed:
  • Youngil Lim

Abstract

In this book Youngil Lim explores the process by which the poverty-stricken agrarian economy of South Korea was transformed over the past three decades into a semi-industrial urban economy. The chief questions Lim addresses are: Where did South Korea's technological knowledge come from? What did the government and market do to nurture such rapid learning? Will a continuation of current policy enable South Korea to catch up with other OECD countries? What is the appropriate role of the National Research and Development Program within the framework of the National System of Innovation? Because they defy quantitative measurement, institutional and organizational skills are often neglected in mainstream economic analyses. Lim shows how institutional and organizational skills help to explain the fast pace of learning and of upgrading technological capability and productivity. After discussing neoclassical views of the South Korean experience as well as the views of economists emphasizing institutional aspects of industrialization, Lim offers his own synthesis and speculates on South Korea's technological future.

Suggested Citation

  • Youngil Lim, 1999. "Technology and Productivity: The Korean Way of Learning and Catching Up," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262122219, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:mtp:titles:0262122219
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Richard Perkins & Eric Neumayer, 2004. "The international diffusion of new technologies: a multi-technology analysis of latecomer advantage and global economic integration," Development and Comp Systems 0407001, EconWPA, revised 08 Dec 2004.
    2. Sviatoslav Moskalev & Seung Park, 2010. "South Korean Chaebols and Value-Based Management," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 92(1), pages 49-62, March.
    3. Oh, Donghyun & Heshmati, Almas & Lööf, Hans, 2014. "Total factor productivity of Korean manufacturing industries: Comparison of competing models with firm-level data," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 25-36.
    4. repec:wsi:ijimxx:v:14:y:2010:i:01:n:s1363919610002556 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Kim, Euysung, 2006. "The impact of family ownership and capital structures on productivity performance of Korean manufacturing firms: Corporate governance and the "chaebol problem"," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 209-233, June.
    6. Yoo-Jin Han & Won-Young Lee, 2007. "The Effects Of The Characteristics Of Korean Firms On The Patent Production Function," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 293-301.
    7. Aouatif El Fakir, 2010. "The State Role in Industries Development: Technological bias, Institutional Learning and Selective Policies
      [Le rôle de l'Etat dans l'industrialisation : biais technologique, apprentissage institut
      ," Working Papers hal-01511778, HAL.
    8. Sohn, Dong-Won & Kenney, Martin, 2007. "Universities, Clusters, and Innovation Systems: The Case of Seoul, Korea," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(6), pages 991-1004, June.
    9. Henry Wai-chung Yeung, 2009. "Regional Development and the Competitive Dynamics of Global Production Networks: An East Asian Perspective," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(3), pages 325-351.
    10. Aouatif El Fakir, 2008. "South Korean System of Innovation: From Imitation to Frontiers of Technology, Successes and Limitations," Post-Print hal-01347728, HAL.
    11. Francisco Garcia-Blanch, 2001. "An Empirical Inquiry into the Nature of South Korean Economic Growth," CID Working Papers 74A, Center for International Development at Harvard University.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    industrialization; technology; South Korea;

    JEL classification:

    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mtp:titles:0262122219. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kristin Waites). General contact details of provider: http://mitpress.mit.edu .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.