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Arab Economies in the Twenty-First Century

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  • Rivlin,Paul

Abstract

This book examines the relationship between demographic growth and economic development in eight Arab countries. Despite a slowdown in demographic growth, as a result of the change in the age structure of the population, the labour force is increasing rapidly. In other parts of the world, similar developments have enhanced economic growth. In the Arab world, however, many of the opportunities presented by demographic transition are being lost, resulting in serious threats to the political stability of the region. The main reason for this is that the region has missed out on industrialization. The book goes beyond conventional analysis to ask two closely related questions. The first is, why were governments so slow in tackling stability? The second is, why has the response been similar in apparently different economies? Answers are provided using new literature in economics and economic history.

Suggested Citation

  • Rivlin,Paul, 2009. "Arab Economies in the Twenty-First Century," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521895002, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:cbooks:9780521895002
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    Cited by:

    1. Fatiha Talahite, 2012. "La rente et l'État rentier recouvrent-ils toute la réalité de l'Algérie d'aujourd'hui ?," Post-Print hal-00717910, HAL.
    2. Frank R. Gunter, 2013. "The Political Economy of Iraq," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14293, April.
    3. Shahid Yusuf, 2014. "Middle East Transitions; A Long, Hard Road," IMF Working Papers 14/135, International Monetary Fund.
    4. Mazaheri Nimah, 2013. "The Saudi monarchy and economic familism in an era of business environment reforms," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 15(3), pages 295-321, October.
    5. Hvidt, Martin, 2013. "Economic diversification in GCC countries: past record and future trends," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 55252, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

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