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Confessions of an internet monopolist: demand estimation for a versioned information good

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  • Henry W. Chappell
  • Paulo Guimarães
  • Orgül Demet Öztürk

Abstract

We develop and apply a method for estimating demand system parameters for versioned information goods. Our analysis uses data collected from a web-based field experiment in which prices and versions of an information good were exogenously varied. Using a maximum simulated likelihood (MSL) procedure, we estimate parameters characterizing distributions of utility functions over a population of potential buyers. We then construct profit‐maximizing versioning and pricing plans for the seller and assess the welfare implications of those plans. Because firms increasingly have opportunities to collect information by tracking behavior of customers, methods similar to ours could be useful in future commercial applications. Copyright (C) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Henry W. Chappell & Paulo Guimarães & Orgül Demet Öztürk, 2011. "Confessions of an internet monopolist: demand estimation for a versioned information good," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(1), pages 1-15, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:mgtdec:v:32:y:2011:i:1:p:1-15
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/mde.1513
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Philippe Aghion & Patrick Bolton & Christopher Harris & Bruno Jullien, 1991. "Optimal Learning by Experimentation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(4), pages 621-654.
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    Cited by:

    1. John S. Jatta & Krishna Kumar Krishnan, 2016. "An empirical assessment of a univariate time series for demand planning in a demand-driven supply chain," International Journal of Business Forecasting and Marketing Intelligence, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 2(3), pages 269-290.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • C81 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - Methodology for Collecting, Estimating, and Organizing Microeconomic Data; Data Access
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness
    • D42 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Monopoly
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments

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