IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/jintdv/v27y2015i1p99-111.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Female Labour Supply in A Developing Economy: A Tale from A Primary Survey

Author

Listed:
  • Basanta K. Pradhan
  • Shalabh K. Singh
  • Arup Mitra

Abstract

The U‐shaped relationship between economic development and female work force participation rate may be explained at the household level in terms of the interaction between social factors and the income of the household. The social attitude and income are likely to be influenced by education, which augments the income on the one hand and on the other shifts women from stigmatised jobs to non‐stigmatised jobs and also reduces the adverse social response towards women participation in the labour market. The shift across sectors of employment is also motivated by education, implying positive associations between education and high productivity jobs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Basanta K. Pradhan & Shalabh K. Singh & Arup Mitra, 2015. "Female Labour Supply in A Developing Economy: A Tale from A Primary Survey," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 27(1), pages 99-111, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:27:y:2015:i:1:p:99-111
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Chhavi Tiwari & Srinivas Goli & Anu Rammohan, 2022. "Reproductive Burden and Its Impact on Female Labor Market Outcomes in India: Evidence from Longitudinal Analyses," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 41(6), pages 2493-2529, December.
    2. Christian Kweku Darko & Fiona Carmichael, 2020. "Education of Biological and Fostered Children in Ghana: The Influence of Relationships with the Household Head and Household Structure," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 32(4), pages 487-504, May.
    3. Helena Marques, 2017. "Gender, entrepreneurship and development: which policies matter?," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 35(2), pages 197-228, January.
    4. Bussemakers, Carlijn & van Oosterhout, Kars & Kraaykamp, Gerbert & Spierings, Niels, 2017. "Women’s Worldwide Education–employment Connection: A Multilevel Analysis of the Moderating Impact of Economic, Political, and Cultural Contexts," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 28-41.
    5. Momoe Makino, 2021. "Female labour force participation and dowries in Pakistan," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 33(3), pages 569-593, April.
    6. Arup Mitra & Basanta K Pradhan, 2016. "Source of Livelihood and Inter-Temporal Mobility Evidence from Western odisha Villages," IEG Working Papers 364, Institute of Economic Growth.
    7. Tiwari, Chhavi & Goli, Srinivas & Rammohan, Anu, 2021. "Reproductive Burden And Its Impact On Female Labour Market Outcomes In India: Evidence From Longitudinal Analyses," SocArXiv nhjvm, Center for Open Science.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:27:y:2015:i:1:p:99-111. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no bibliographic references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Wiley Content Delivery (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.