IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/wly/hlthec/v9y2000i4p327-335.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Fieller's method and net health benefits

Author

Listed:
  • Daniel F. Heitjan

Abstract

Statistical and conceptual difficulties complicate the estimation of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). An alternative approach is to measure cost-effectiveness by the incremental net health benefit (INHB), defined as the difference in mean effectiveness of a new treatment compared with a standard, adjusted for cost difference by subtracting the health foregone if purchasing care at the rate of a marginally cost-effective therapy. Because net health benefit (NHB) is dependent on this threshold rate, one can construct confidence intervals for the INHB at various values of the rate. It turns out that the set of rates where new and standard are not significantly different is equal to the Fieller's method confidence set for the ICER. We review the derivation of the Fieller's method confidence set, present numerical examples, and discuss the implications of our result for the calculation and interpretation of NHB analyses. Copyright © 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel F. Heitjan, 2000. "Fieller's method and net health benefits," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(4), pages 327-335.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:9:y:2000:i:4:p:327-335
    DOI: 10.1002/1099-1050(200006)9:4<327::AID-HEC517>3.0.CO;2-S
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Daniel Polsky & Henry A. Glick & Richard Willke & Kevin Schulman, 1997. "Confidence Intervals for Cost-Effectiveness Ratios: A Comparison of Four Methods," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(3), pages 243-252.
    2. Andrew H. Briggs & David E. Wonderling & Christopher Z. Mooney, 1997. "Pulling cost-effectiveness analysis up by its bootstraps: A non-parametric approach to confidence interval estimation," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(4), pages 327-340.
    3. Eugene M. Laska & Morris Meisner & Carole Siegel, 1997. "Statistical Inference for Cost-Effectiveness Ratios," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 6(3), pages 229-242.
    4. Aaron A. Stinnett & John Mullahy, 1998. "Net Health Benefits: A New Framework for the Analysis of Uncertainty in Cost-Effectiveness Analysis," NBER Technical Working Papers 0227, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Andrew Briggs & Paul Fenn, 1998. "Confidence intervals or surfaces? Uncertainty on the cost-effectiveness plane," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 7(8), pages 723-740.
    6. Daniel F. Heitjan & Alan J. Moskowitz & William Whang, 1999. "Bayesian estimation of cost-effectiveness ratios from clinical trials," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 191-201.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Andrew Briggs, 2012. "Statistical Methods for Cost-effectiveness Analysis Alongside Clinical Trials," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to Health Economics, Second Edition, chapter 50 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Richard M. Nixon & David Wonderling & Richard D. Grieve, 2010. "Non-parametric methods for cost-effectiveness analysis: the central limit theorem and the bootstrap compared," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(3), pages 316-333.
    3. Morris Meisner & Eugene M. Laska & Carole Siegel & Joseph Wanderling, 2002. "The familywise error rate of a simultaneous confidence band for the incremental net health benefit," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(3), pages 275-280.
    4. Eugene M. Laska & Morris Meisner & Carole Siegel & Joseph Wanderling, 2002. "Statistical determination of cost-effectiveness frontier based on net health benefits," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(3), pages 249-264.
    5. Simon Eckermann & Andrew R. Willan, 2009. "Globally optimal trial design for local decision making," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(2), pages 203-216.
    6. Nandita Mitra & Alka Indurkhya, 2005. "A propensity score approach to estimating the cost-effectiveness of medical therapies from observational data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(8), pages 805-815.
    7. Andrew R. Willan & Andrew H. Briggs & Jeffrey S. Hoch, 2004. "Regression methods for covariate adjustment and subgroup analysis for non-censored cost-effectiveness data," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(5), pages 461-475.
    8. Daniel F. Heitjan & Huiling Li, 2004. "Bayesian estimation of cost-effectiveness: an importance-sampling approach," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 13(2), pages 191-198.
    9. Daniel F. Heitjan & Alan J. Moskowitz & William Whang, 1999. "Bayesian estimation of cost-effectiveness ratios from clinical trials," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 8(3), pages 191-201.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wly:hlthec:v:9:y:2000:i:4:p:327-335. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/5749 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.