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Some Determinants of the Variation in Earnings for College Men

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  • Ritchie H. Reed
  • Herman P. Miller

Abstract

The influences of several factors on the earnings of men with college degrees were measured using multiple regression with dummy variables. Earnings were found to be positively related to the rank of the colleges where degrees were received. For the holders of bachelor's degrees, engineering, the physical sciences, and business and commerce offer the greatest monetary rewards. For those with higher degrees, health fields and law offer the greatest returns. After accounting for college quality, age, field of specialization, and level of degree, nonwhites were found to have significantly lower average earnings than whites. The difference at each degree level is over $2,400 per year. Other factors tend to reinforce the lower earnings attributable to being nonwhite. Several background factors were introduced into the analysis, but they did not appear to be very important in determining the earnings of college men.

Suggested Citation

  • Ritchie H. Reed & Herman P. Miller, 1970. "Some Determinants of the Variation in Earnings for College Men," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 5(2), pages 177-119.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:5:y:1970:i:2:p:177-19
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    Cited by:

    1. Kermit Daniel & Dan Black & Jeffery Smith, 1996. "College Characteristics and the Wages of Young Women," HEW 9604002, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Kermit Daniel & Dan Black & Jeffery Smith, 1996. "College Quality and the Wages of Young Men," HEW 9604001, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Dominic J. Brewer & Eric Eide & Ronald G. Ehrenberg, 1996. "Does It Pay To Attend An Elite Private College? Cross Cohort Evidence on the Effects of College Quality on Earnings," NBER Working Papers 5613, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Hartog, Joop & Sun, Yuze & Ding, Xiaohao, 2010. "University rank and bachelor's labour market positions in China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 971-979, December.

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