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Markups and the Euro

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  • David Cook

    (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)

Abstract

This paper reports evidence that OECD economies adopting fixed exchange rates in the process of forming the European currency union experienced declines in labor share of income at the industry level. This occurs most sharply among countries that experienced the biggest changes in their exchange rate policy. An implication of New Keynesian sticky price theory is that monetary policy has a first-order impact on labor share through the interaction of business cycle uncertainty and the choice of optimal markups. However, there is also evidence that goods market integration encouraged by the euro had a negative impact on the bargaining position of labor. © 2011 The President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • David Cook, 2011. "Markups and the Euro," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(4), pages 1440-1452, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:93:y:2011:i:4:p:1440-1452
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jakob Madsen, 2008. "Semi-endogenous versus Schumpeterian growth models: testing the knowledge production function using international data," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(1), pages 1-26, March.
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    4. Adriana Di Liberto & Francesco Pigliaru & Roberto Mura, 2008. "How to measure the unobservable: a panel technique for the analysis of TFP convergence," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(2), pages 343-368, April.
    5. Jakob B. Madsen, 2009. "Trade Barriers, Openness, and Economic Growth," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 76(2), pages 397-418, October.
    6. Dan Ben-David, 1993. "Equalizing Exchange: Trade Liberalization and Income Convergence," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 653-679.
    7. Jakob B. Madsen, 2008. "Economic Growth, TFP Convergence and the World Export of Ideas: A Century of Evidence," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 110(1), pages 145-167, March.
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