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More Choice, Less Crime

Author

Listed:
  • Angela K. Dills

    () (Department of Economics, Providence College)

  • Rey Hernández-Julián

    () (Department of Economics, Metropolitan State College of Denver)

Abstract

Previous research debates whether public school choice improves students' academic outcomes, but there is little examination of its effects on their nonacademic outcomes. We use data from a nationally representative sample of high school students, a previously developed Tiebout choice measure, and metropolitan-level data on teenage arrest rates to examine how public school choice affects students' propensity to be arrested or to join a gang. Adolescents in metropolitan areas with more public school choice are less likely to be associated with criminal activity, suggesting that the benefits of public school choice extend outside the classroom. © 2011 Association for Education Finance and Policy

Suggested Citation

  • Angela K. Dills & Rey Hernández-Julián, 2011. "More Choice, Less Crime," Education Finance and Policy, MIT Press, vol. 6(2), pages 246-266, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:edfpol:v:6:y:2011:i:2:p:246-266
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    public school choice; student nonacademic outcomes; student crime;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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