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The Role of Trust in the Resource Allocation Process of an Old University


  • Melina M. Manochin

    () (Finance, Accounting and Law Group, Aston Business School, Aston University, UK)


The issue of effective management accounting systems, and especially the resource allocation procedures, have attracted considerable interest among higher education institutions in recent years. Relevant previous research indicates that several universities adopt different approaches to the resource allocation problem, employing models and procedures that reflect their organisational arrangements and their internal socio – political dynamics. We argue that while studying accounting processes in their organisational context, the role of trust should also be considered carefully. In particular, it is very important to consider the attitudes of the individuals involved and interacting within organisational processes, and especially the trust between them, which plays an important role to the overall good governance of these processes. In our study, the role of interpersonal trust in an old Scottish University resource allocation process is examined. The study indicates that trust is a very necessary insight to the facilitation of social structures of accountability that enhance a better governance of the resource allocation process.

Suggested Citation

  • Melina M. Manochin, 2008. "The Role of Trust in the Resource Allocation Process of an Old University," International Journal of Business and Economic Sciences Applied Research (IJBESAR), Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Institute of Technology (EMATTECH), Kavala, Greece, vol. 1(2), pages 38-52, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:tei:journl:v:1:y:2008:i:2:p:38-52

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Marcel P. Timmer & Erik Dietzenbacher & Bart Los & Robert Stehrer & Gaaitzen J. Vries, 2015. "An Illustrated User Guide to the World Input–Output Database: the Case of Global Automotive Production," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(3), pages 575-605, August.
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    More about this item


    Organisational Trust; Universities; Resource Allocation; Organisational Context of Accounting;

    JEL classification:

    • M41 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Accounting - - - Accounting
    • D73 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Bureaucracy; Administrative Processes in Public Organizations; Corruption
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General


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