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Technological Relatedness and Knowledge Space: Entry and Exit of US Cities from Patent Classes

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  • David L. Rigby

Abstract

R igby D. L. Technological relatedness and knowledge space: entry and exit of US cities from patent classes, Regional Studies . US patent and citation data are used to measure technological relatedness between major patent classes in the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The technological relatedness measures, constructed as the probability that a patent in class j will cite a patent in class i , form the links of a knowledge network. Changes in this knowledge network are examined from 1975 to 2005. Evolution of the patent knowledge base within US metropolitan areas is tracked by combining the knowledge network with annual patent data for each city. Entries and exits of cities from patent classes are linked to local and non-local measures of technological relatedness.

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  • David L. Rigby, 2015. "Technological Relatedness and Knowledge Space: Entry and Exit of US Cities from Patent Classes," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(11), pages 1922-1937, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:regstd:v:49:y:2015:i:11:p:1922-1937
    DOI: 10.1080/00343404.2013.854878
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    1. Ricardo Hausmann & Bailey Klinger, 2007. "The Structure of the Product Space and the Evolution of Comparative Advantage," CID Working Papers 146, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    2. Alessandra Colombelli & Jackie Krafft & Francesco Quatraro, 2012. "The emergence of new technology-based sectors at the regional level: a proximity-based analysis of nanotechnology," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1211, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Jun 2012.
    3. Quatraro, Francesco, 2010. "Knowledge coherence, variety and economic growth: Manufacturing evidence from Italian regions," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1289-1302, December.
    4. David L. Rigby & J├╝rgen Essletzbichler, 2006. "Technological variety, technological change and a geography of production techniques," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 6(1), pages 45-70, January.
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