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The governance of REDD+: an institutional analysis in the Asia Pacific region and beyond

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  • Tim Cadman
  • Tek Maraseni

Abstract

This paper explores the changing nature of North/South relations in contemporary climate change governance. Focusing on the United Nations Collaborative Programme to Reduce Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+), the paper presents a theoretical framework, through which stakeholder perceptions of REDD+ governance quality and institutional legitimacy can be evaluated. This is tested by means of a small- n survey of state and non-state participants from both the developed and developing countries, including the Asia-Pacific region. The survey results reveal generally higher ratings for REDD+ amongst Southern participants than in the North. A number of caveats are placed on the interpretation of data, and some conclusions drawn regarding contemporary climate governance and the emergence of a possible ‘South/North Divide’, challenging traditional notions of global power politics.

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  • Tim Cadman & Tek Maraseni, 2012. "The governance of REDD+: an institutional analysis in the Asia Pacific region and beyond," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 55(5), pages 617-635, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jenpmg:v:55:y:2012:i:5:p:617-635
    DOI: 10.1080/09640568.2011.619851
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/09640568.2011.619851
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Airong & Moffat, Kieren, 2015. "A balancing act: The role of benefits, impacts and confidence in governance in predicting acceptance of mining in Australia," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 25-34.
    2. Cadman, Timothy & Maraseni, Tek & Ma, Hwan Ok & Lopez-Casero, Federico, 2017. "Five years of REDD+ governance: The use of market mechanisms as a response to anthropogenic climate change," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 8-16.
    3. Tobias Nielsen, 2014. "The role of discourses in governing forests to combat climate change," International Environmental Agreements: Politics, Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 14(3), pages 265-280, September.

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