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What Level of Information Enables the Public to Act Like Experts When Evaluating Ecological Goods?

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  • Wendy Kenyon
  • Gareth Edwards-Jones

Abstract

Although contingent valuation is widely discussed in the literature as a technique for environmental valuation, it is well recognized that a number of problems are associated with its use. This paper seeks to address two of these problems: the difficulty of externally verifying the results of a CV study; and the choice of an appropriate level of information to provide to respondents. Four sites were evaluated, first by expert ecologists and then by the general public using the CV method. In conducting the CV, six different categories of information were presented to different groups of respondents to test which was most appropriate.The results show that, given an information set consisting of photographic,textual and ecological data, respondents to a CV study were able to rank the four sites in the same order as ecological experts. This may be seen as a form of external verification to the results of the contingent valuation.

Suggested Citation

  • Wendy Kenyon & Gareth Edwards-Jones, 1998. "What Level of Information Enables the Public to Act Like Experts When Evaluating Ecological Goods?," Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(4), pages 463-475.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jenpmg:v:41:y:1998:i:4:p:463-475
    DOI: 10.1080/09640569811542
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    Cited by:

    1. Phoebe Koundouri, "undated". "Econometrics Informing Natural Resources Management:Selected Empirical Analyses," DEOS Working Papers 0401, Athens University of Economics and Business.
    2. Abbie A. Rogers, 2013. "Public and Expert Preference Divergence: Evidence from a Choice Experiment of Marine Reserves in Australia," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 89(2), pages 346-370.
    3. Li, Xiaoshu & Boyle, Kevin J. & Holmes, Thomas P. & LaRouche, Genevieve Pullis, 2014. "The effect of on-site forest experience on stated preferences for low-impact timber harvesting programs," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 348-362.
    4. McCartney, Abbie, 2009. "The Policy Relevance of Choice Modelling: An Application to the Ningaloo and Proposed Capes Marine Parks," 2009 Conference (53rd), February 11-13, 2009, Cairns, Australia 48033, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    5. Li, Xiaoshu & Boyle, Kevin J. & Pullis, Genevieve, 2012. "Does On-site Experience Affect Responses to Stated Preference Questions?," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124991, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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