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Clickenomics: Using a Classroom Response System to Increase Student Engagement in a Large-Enrollment Principles of Economics Course

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  • Michael K. Salemi

Abstract

One of the most important challenges facing college instructors of economics is helping students engage. Engagement is particularly important in a large-enrollment Principles of Economics course, where it can help students achieve a long-lived understanding of how economists use basic economic ideas to look at the world. The author reports how instructors can use Classroom Response Systems (clickers) to promote engagement in the Principles course. He draws heavily on his own experience in teaching a one semester Principles course at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill but also reports on how others have used clickers to promote engagement. He concludes with evidence that students find clickers very beneficial and with an assessment of the costs and benefits of adopting a clicker system.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael K. Salemi, 2009. "Clickenomics: Using a Classroom Response System to Increase Student Engagement in a Large-Enrollment Principles of Economics Course," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(4), pages 385-404, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:40:y:2009:i:4:p:385-404
    DOI: 10.1080/00220480903237950
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alcalde, Pilar & Nagel, Juan, 2015. "Does active learning improve student performance? A randomized experiment in a Chilean university," MPRA Paper 68994, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. R. Inglesi-Lotz & Fritz Dresselhaus & J. Bohlmann, 2015. "Assessing the Impact of Just-in-Time Methodology, In-Lecture Activities, and Tutor-Assisted Post-Lecture Activities in the Course Experience of First Year Students in Economics at the University of Pr," Working Papers 201590, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    3. Stephen Buckles & Gail M. Hoyt & Jennifer Imazeki, 2011. "Making the Large-Enrollment Course Interactive and Engaging," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 10 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Ken Rebeck & Carlos Asarta, 2011. "Methods of Assessment in the College Economics Course," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 16 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Mark Maier, 2011. "Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Adapting a Physics Education Pedagogy for Use in the Economics Classroom," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Ameeta Jain & Alan Farley, 2012. "Mobile Phone-Based Audience Response System and Student Engagement in Large-Group Teaching," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 31(4), pages 428-439, December.
    7. Michael K. Salemi, 2010. "Developing Teacher Expertise for Economists through a Workshop Experience," Chapters,in: Teaching Innovations in Economics, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Joseph Calhoun & Dirk Mateer, 2011. "Incorporating Media and Response Systems in the Economics Classroom," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 13 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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