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Doing Economics: Enhancing Skills through a Process-Oriented Senior Research Course


  • KimMarie McGoldrick


The author describes a senior-level course designed to promote student skills in "acting like economists." Although most departments offer senior-level courses, this one is unique in that it was developed on the basis of learning as opposed to content objectives, assignments are designed to reinforce and further develop research skills through a project of the student's choosing, and it more closely models what it means to "act like an economist" (W. L. Hansen 2006). The author discusses the development of this course and its unique features, the research process followed by students and the outcomes generated, and some of the advantages and disadvantages associated with this form of senior research course.

Suggested Citation

  • KimMarie McGoldrick, 2008. "Doing Economics: Enhancing Skills through a Process-Oriented Senior Research Course," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(4), pages 342-356, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:39:y:2008:i:4:p:342-356 DOI: 10.3200/JECE.39.4.342-356

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Byron W. Brown & Carl E. Liedholm, 2002. "Can Web Courses Replace the Classroom in Principles of Microeconomics?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(2), pages 444-448, May.
    2. Coates, Dennis & Humphreys, Brad R. & Kane, John & Vachris, Michelle A., 2004. ""No significant distance" between face-to-face and online instruction: evidence from principles of economics," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(5), pages 533-546, October.
    3. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    4. Peter Navarro, 2000. "Economics in the Cyberclassroom," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 119-132, Spring.
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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. W. Lee Hansen, 2011. "An Expected Proficiencies Approach to the Economics Major," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 17 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Juan Luis Jiménez & Jordi Perdiguero & Ancor Suárez, 2011. "Debating as a classroom tool for adapting learning outcomes to the European higher education area," IREA Working Papers 201109, University of Barcelona, Research Institute of Applied Economics, revised Jun 2011.
    3. repec:aea:aecrev:v:107:y:2017:i:5:p:655-59 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Li, Ishuan & Simonson, Robert D., 2016. "The value of a redesigned program and capstone course in economics," International Review of Economics Education, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 48-58.

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