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On the planning and design of sample surveys


  • Ron Kenett


Surveys rely on structured questions used to map out reality, using sample observations from a population frame, into data that can be statistically analyzed. This paper focuses on the planning and design of surveys, making a distinction between individual surveys, household surveys and establishment surveys. Knowledge from cognitive science is used to provide guidelines on questionnaire design. Non-standard, but simple, statistical methods are described for analyzing survey results. The paper is based on experience gained by conducting over 150 customer satisfaction surveys in Europe, America and the Far East.

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  • Ron Kenett, 2006. "On the planning and design of sample surveys," Journal of Applied Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 33(4), pages 405-415.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:japsta:v:33:y:2006:i:4:p:405-415 DOI: 10.1080/02664760500448974

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. K. Govindaraju & S. Balamurali, 1998. "Chain sampling plan for variables inspection," Journal of Applied Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 103-109.
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    Cited by:

    1. Silvia Salini & Ron Kenett, 2009. "Bayesian networks of customer satisfaction survey data," Journal of Applied Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(11), pages 1177-1189.


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