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The Euro: An Italian perspective

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  • Augusto Graziani

Abstract

The adoption of Euro as a common currency of twelve European countries has meant a considerable change in the Italian exchange rate policy. In the past, before Italy entered the EMS and again in 1992-96 when Italy temporarily left the EMS, the Italian monetary authorities enacted a policy of managed exchange rates, aiming at keeping the dollar rate stable, while letting the Italian lira depreciate vis-a-vis the German mark. By so doing, the danger of imported inflation was reduced (the dollar area was then a major import area) and at the same time the Italian exports to Europe were made easier. In the presence of a regime of fixed exchange rates in the European area, Italian industry is trying to make its exports more competitive by means of a reduction in costs. This means moving segments of production to small or middle-size firms, located in Italy as well as in developing countries. A further help is coming from the gradual but consistent depreciation of the Euro against the US dollar. The relevance of the dollar area in Italian exports has been correspondingly increasing.

Suggested Citation

  • Augusto Graziani, 2002. "The Euro: An Italian perspective," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1), pages 97-105.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:16:y:2002:i:1:p:97-105 DOI: 10.1080/02692170110114221
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Francesco Carlucci & Alessandro Girardi, 2004. "National Specifities and Monetary-Policy Trasmission in Europe," Working Papers 73, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
    2. Domenicantonio Fausto, 2014. "Augusto Graziani: a profile," STUDI ECONOMICI, FrancoAngeli Editore, vol. 2014(112), pages 10-28.
    3. Stefano Lucarelli & Roberto Romano, 2016. "The Italian Crisis within the European Crisis. The Relevance of the Technological Foreign Constraint," World Economic Review, World Economics Association, vol. 2016(6), pages 1-12, February.
    4. Andini, Corrado & Cabral, Ricardo, 2012. "Further Austerity and Wage Cuts Will Worsen the Euro Crisis," IZA Policy Papers 37, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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