IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/applec/v40y2008i1p53-62.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Measuring displacement effects across gaming products: a study of Australian gambling markets

Author

Listed:
  • Lisa Farrell
  • David Forrest

Abstract

This article seeks to establish the extent of displacement effects across gaming products. This is a particularly difficult question to address with precision. To date, many studies have looked at policy changes such as the introduction of a new product into the market to assess the severity of displacement effects. However, simple before and after comparisons are invalid. One needs to know what the appropriate counterfactual would have been in the absence of the policy change - which by its very nature is unobservable. The alternative is to look at identical populations exposed to different regimes. Australia represents such a natural experiment. In Australia, Betting and Gaming legislation is determined at the state level, giving rise to some interesting differentials across states within a single country. This article estimates a state level (fixed effects) panel data model, exploiting the intra-state differences in the portfolio of gaming products available, to estimate the extent of displacement effects across the gaming sector. The results are particularly relevant to the current UK policy debate, which is focused on the potential impact on the existing market following a forthcoming, radical deregulation of the industry (with further liberalization proposed).

Suggested Citation

  • Lisa Farrell & David Forrest, 2008. "Measuring displacement effects across gaming products: a study of Australian gambling markets," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(1), pages 53-62.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:40:y:2008:i:1:p:53-62
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840701591379
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00036840701591379
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Humphreys, Brad & Perez, Levi, 2011. "Lottery Participants and Revenues: An International Survey of Economic Research on Lotteries," Working Papers 2011-17, University of Alberta, Department of Economics.
    2. Brad Humphreys & Levi Perez, 2012. "Network externalities in consumer spending on lottery games: evidence from Spain," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 42(3), pages 929-945, June.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:40:y:2008:i:1:p:53-62. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.