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Elections and UK government expenditure cycles in the 1980s: an empirical analysis

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  • Joshy Easaw
  • Dean Garratt

Abstract

This paper tests whether there exists any significant difference in the responsiveness of UK government expenditure policy to changes in national income and unemployment in pre- and post-election periods. The absence of such a political effect would see the national income and unemployment elasticities for government expenditure being uniform over an election period. The empirical analysis deliberately covers the three UK Conservative governments between 1979 and 1992 when academic debate on the implications of discretionary policy for the economy and social welfare were particularly prominent and when it appeared that political rhetoric concurred with the academic prescriptions.

Suggested Citation

  • Joshy Easaw & Dean Garratt, 2000. "Elections and UK government expenditure cycles in the 1980s: an empirical analysis," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(3), pages 381-391.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:32:y:2000:i:3:p:381-391
    DOI: 10.1080/000368400322804
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    Cited by:

    1. Arns, J├╝rgen & Bhattacharya, Kaushik, 2005. "Modelling Aggregate Consumption Growth with Time-Varying Parameters," Bonn Econ Discussion Papers 15/2005, University of Bonn, Bonn Graduate School of Economics (BGSE).
    2. Chin-Tsai Lin & Yi-Hsien Wang, 2005. "An Analysis of Political Changes on Nikkei 225 Stock Returns and Volatilities," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 6(1), pages 169-183, May.
    3. Fatih Ozatay, 2007. "Public sector price controls and electoral cycles," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(4), pages 527-539.
    4. Easaw, Joshy Z. & Garratt, Dean, 2006. "General elections and government expenditure cycles: Theory and evidence from the UK," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(2), pages 292-306, June.
    5. Chung-Chu Chuang & Yi-Hsien Wang, 2009. "Developed stock market reaction to political change: a panel data analysis," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 43(6), pages 941-949, November.
    6. Beate Jochimsen & Robert Nuscheler, 2011. "The political economy of the German Lander deficits: weak governments meet strong finance ministers," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(19), pages 2399-2415.
    7. Kollias, Christos & Papadamou, Stephanos & Psarianos, Iacovos, 2014. "Fiscal imbalances and asymmetric adjustment under Labour and Conservative governments in the UK," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 208-213.

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