IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/taf/applec/v31y1999i10p1283-1291.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Testing Wagner versus Keynes using disaggregated public expenditure data for Canada

Author

Listed:
  • Bagala Biswal
  • Urvashi Dhawan
  • Hooi-Yean Lee

Abstract

This paper attempts to test Wagnerian versus Keynesian hypotheses by examining the relationship between national income and total public expenditure as well as its various components for Canada during the period 1950-1995. Engle and Granger's two-step cointegration and error correction techniques are employed to test these two hypotheses. The results of this study support both the hypotheses when tested with broader aggregate expenditure data, i.e. total government current expenditure (CE) and total current expenditures on goods and services (CEGS). Although the results of this study do not support the existence of any long-run relationship between GDP and the disaggregated public expenditure variables, they do support the existence of short-run causation implying that national income may be causing or caused by a component of the total government current expenditure in the short run.

Suggested Citation

  • Bagala Biswal & Urvashi Dhawan & Hooi-Yean Lee, 1999. "Testing Wagner versus Keynes using disaggregated public expenditure data for Canada," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(10), pages 1283-1291.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:31:y:1999:i:10:p:1283-1291
    DOI: 10.1080/000368499323490
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/000368499323490
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Antoniou Antonis & Katrakilidis Constantinos & Tsaliki Persefoni, 2013. "Wagner’s Law versus Keynesian Hypothesis: Evidence from pre-WWII Greece," Panoeconomicus, Savez ekonomista Vojvodine, Novi Sad, Serbia, vol. 60(4), pages 457-472, June.
    2. Narayan, Paresh Kumar & Nielsen, Ingrid & Smyth, Russell, 2008. "Panel data, cointegration, causality and Wagner's law: Empirical evidence from Chinese provinces," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 297-307, June.
    3. Jan Kuckuck, 2014. "Testing Wagner's Law at Different Stages of Economic Development," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 70(1), pages 128-168, March.
    4. Ageli, Mohammed Moosa, 2013. "Wagner’s Law in Saudi Arabia 1970 - 2012: An Econometric Analysis," MPRA Paper 46594, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Manuel Jaen-Garcia, 2011. "Empirical Analysis of Wagner’s Law for the Spain’s Regions," International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, Human Resource Management Academic Research Society, International Journal of Academic Research in Accounting, Finance and Management Sciences, vol. 1(1), pages 1-17, November.
    6. Ali, Wajid & Munir, Kashif, 2016. "Testing Wagner versus Keynesian Hypothesis for Pakistan: The Role of Aggregate and Disaggregate Expenditure," MPRA Paper 74570, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Yaya Keho, 2016. "Testing Wagner’s Law in the Presence of Structural Changes: New Evidence from Six African Countries (1960-2013)," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(1), pages 1-6.
    8. Christian Richter & Dimitrios Paparas, 2012. "The validity of Wagner’s Law in Greece during the last 2 centuries," Working Papers 2012.2, International Network for Economic Research - INFER.
    9. Durevall, Dick & Henrekson, Magnus, 2011. "The futile quest for a grand explanation of long-run government expenditure," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7), pages 708-722.
    10. Ageli, Dr Mohammed Moosa, 2013. "Does Education Expenditure Promote Economic Growth in Saudi Arabia? An Econometric Analysis," MPRA Paper 46673, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. repec:eco:journ1:2018-01-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Magazzino, Cosimo, 2010. "Wagner's law and augmented Wagner's law in EU-27. A time-series analysis on stationarity, cointegration and causality," MPRA Paper 26668, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. V. Chandran Govindaraju & Ramesh Rao & Sajid Anwar, 2011. "Economic growth and government spending in Malaysia: a re-examination of Wagner and Keynesian views," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 203-219, August.
    14. Mohammed MoosaAgeli, 2013. "Wagner’s Law in Saudi Arabia 1970 - 2012: An Econometric Analysis," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 3(5), pages 647-659, May.
    15. repec:ibn:ijefaa:v:9:y:2017:i:5:p:171-180 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Leshoro, Temitope L A, 2017. "An empirical analysis of disaggregated government expenditure and economic growth in South Africa," Working Papers 22644, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:31:y:1999:i:10:p:1283-1291. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Longhurst). General contact details of provider: http://www.tandfonline.com/RAEC20 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.