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Uncertainty and international return migration: some evidence from linked register data

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  • Jan Saarela
  • Dan-Olof Rooth

Abstract

This article provides the first empirical evidence about the role of uncertainty in international return migration decisions using high-quality and detailed micro-data that cover migrants who were observed in both the source country before emigration and in the host country subsequent to immigration. We find that uncertainty in the initial migration decision might be an important driving mechanism behind the decision to return migrate, because migrants with a worse-than-expected outcome in the host country upon arrival and shortly thereafter have a notably higher probability of return migration than other migrants.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Saarela & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2012. "Uncertainty and international return migration: some evidence from linked register data," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(18), pages 1893-1897, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:19:y:2012:i:18:p:1893-1897 DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2012.674196
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. P. A. Riach & J. Rich, 2002. "Field Experiments of Discrimination in the Market Place," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 112(483), pages 480-518, November.
    2. John A. List, 2004. "The Nature and Extent of Discrimination in the Marketplace: Evidence from the Field," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 119(1), pages 49-89.
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    Cited by:

    1. Analia Olgiati & Rocio Calvo & Lisa Berkman, 2013. "Are Migrants Going Up a Blind Alley? Economic Migration and Life Satisfaction around the World: Cross-National Evidence from Europe, North America and Australia," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 114(2), pages 383-404, November.
    2. Saarela, Jan, 2015. "Worse than expected? Uncertainty and earnings subsequent to return migration," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 28-30.
    3. Simeon Coleman & Juan Carlos Cuestas & Estefanía Mourelle, 2011. "Investigating the oil price-exchange rate nexus: Evidence from Africa," Working Papers 2011015, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised May 2011.

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