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Hypertension and life satisfaction: an analysis using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe


  • Stefania Mojon-Azzi
  • Alfonso Sousa-Poza


This study examines the relationship between hypertension and life satisfaction using more objective measures of hypertension from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe. Our results confirm the analysis in Blanchflower and Oswald (2008): there is a significant negative correlation between high blood pressure problems and life satisfaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefania Mojon-Azzi & Alfonso Sousa-Poza, 2011. "Hypertension and life satisfaction: an analysis using data from the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(2), pages 183-187.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:18:y:2011:i:2:p:183-187 DOI: 10.1080/13504850903508291

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Philipp Harms & Heinrich W. Ursprung, 2002. "Do Civil and Political Repression Really Boost Foreign Direct Investments?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 40(4), pages 651-663, October.
    2. Neumayer, Eric & Soysa, Indra de, 2006. "Globalization and the Right to Free Association and Collective Bargaining: An Empirical Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 31-49, January.
    3. Beata Smarzynska Javorcik & Mariana Spatareanu, 2005. "Do Foreign Investors Care about Labor Market Regulations?," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 141(3), pages 375-403, October.
    4. Leahy, Dermot & Montagna, Catia, 2000. "Unionisation and Foreign Direct Investment: Challenging Conventional Wisdom?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 110(462), pages 80-92, March.
    5. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    6. Jan I. Haaland & Ian Wooton & Giulia Faggio, 2002. "Multinational Firms: Easy Come, Easy Go?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 59(1), pages 1-3, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. David G. Blanchflower, 2009. "International Evidence on Well-Being," NBER Chapters,in: Measuring the Subjective Well-Being of Nations: National Accounts of Time Use and Well-Being, pages 155-226 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Luca Zanin, 2013. "Detecting Unobserved Heterogeneity in the Relationship Between Subjective Well-Being and Satisfaction in Various Domains of Life Using the REBUS-PLS Path Modelling Approach: A Case Study," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 110(1), pages 281-304, January.
    3. Hai V. Nguyen, 2016. "Keeping Up with the Joneses: Neighbourhood Wealth and Hypertension," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 17(3), pages 1255-1271, June.

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