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Learning in asymmetric duopoly markets: competition in information and market correlation


  • Dolores Alepuz


  • Amparo Urbano



This paper explores experimentation and learning in asymmetric duopoly markets with product differentiation and demand uncertainty. We define the concepts of strategic substitutability and strategic complementarity in information and we show how both the mode of information competition and the transmission of information across markets affect duopoly experimentation. We relate information competition with market competition and we find that, when goods are substitutes and the correlation between market shocks is negative, firms will have a higher incentive to experiment in asymmetric markets than in symmetric ones. The opposite result follows when such correlation is positive. Also, when goods are complements the above findings are reversed. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin/Heidelberg 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Dolores Alepuz & Amparo Urbano, 2005. "Learning in asymmetric duopoly markets: competition in information and market correlation," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 209-243, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:specre:v:7:y:2005:i:3:p:209-243 DOI: 10.1007/s10108-005-0099-5

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hand, John R M & Holthausen, Robert W & Leftwich, Richard W, 1992. " The Effect of Bond Rating Agency Announcements on Bond and Stock Prices," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 47(2), pages 733-752, June.
    2. Crouhy, Michel & Galai, Dan & Mark, Robert, 2001. "Prototype risk rating system," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 47-95, January.
    3. Impson, C Michael & Karafiath, Imre & Glascock, John L, 1992. "Testing Beta Stationarity across Bond Rating Changes," The Financial Review, Eastern Finance Association, vol. 27(4), pages 607-618, November.
    4. M.J. Barron & A.D. Clare & S.H. Thomas, 1997. "The Effect of Bond Rating Changes and New Ratings on UK Stock Returns," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 24(3), pages 497-509.
    5. Cable, John & Holland, Kevin, 1999. "Regression vs. non-regression models of normal returns: implications for event studies," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 81-85, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dan Bernhardt & Bart Taub, 2015. "Learning about common and private values in oligopoly," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 46(1), pages 66-85, March.
    2. Barrachina, Alex & Tauman, Yair & Urbano, Amparo, 2014. "Entry and espionage with noisy signals," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 127-146.


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