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“Tolerated One Way but Not the Other”: Levels and Determinants of Social and Political Tolerance in Hong Kong

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  • Francis Lee

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Abstract

Tolerance constitutes one of the core elements of a democratic political culture and an indicator of social cohesion. While the concepts of social tolerance and political tolerance have each generated a substantial body of literature, few studies have examined the two forms of tolerance simultaneously. Empirically, this study examines Hong Kong people’s social and political tolerance toward five minority or non-conformist groups. Analysis of survey data shows that degree of tolerance varies substantially across target groups. More important, the group that is the most tolerated socially is not necessarily the most tolerated politically. Many people are found to be holding the attitudes of “quiet co-existence” or “respectful distance” toward specific minority or non-conformist groups. This article also examines the demographic and attitudinal predictors of tolerance. It finds that tolerance is stronger among the youngest cohort and weaker among new immigrants. Tolerance is also significantly related to social trust and post-materialist orientation, yet not to a sense of relative deprivation. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Francis Lee, 2014. "“Tolerated One Way but Not the Other”: Levels and Determinants of Social and Political Tolerance in Hong Kong," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 118(2), pages 711-727, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:118:y:2014:i:2:p:711-727
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-013-0433-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Allison Harell, 2010. "Political Tolerance, Racist Speech, and the Influence of Social Networks," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 91(3), pages 724-740.
    2. repec:cup:apsrev:v:75:y:1981:i:01:p:92-106_17 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Simon Ho & Raymond Chan, 2009. "Social Harmony in Hong Kong: Level, Determinants and Policy Implications," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 91(1), pages 37-58, March.
    4. Ka-Ying Wong & Po-San Wan, 2009. "New Evidence of the Postmaterialist Shift: The Experience of Hong Kong," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 92(3), pages 497-515, July.
    5. repec:cup:apsrev:v:76:y:1982:i:03:p:603-620_18 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marco Marozzi, 2016. "Construction, Robustness Assessment and Application of an Index of Perceived Level of Socio-Economic Threat from Immigrants: A Study of 47 European Countries and Regions," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 413-437, August.
    2. B. Dima & Ş. M. Dima, 2016. "Income Distribution and Social Tolerance," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(1), pages 439-466, August.
    3. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1449-4 is not listed on IDEAS

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