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Modelling the alongshore variability of optimum rip current escape strategies on a multiple rip-channelled beach

Author

Listed:
  • Bruno Castelle

    (CNRS, UMR EPOC 5805
    University of Bordeaux, UMR EPOC 5805)

  • R. Jak McCarroll

    (The University of Sydney)

  • Robert W. Brander

    (UNSW Australia)

  • Timothy Scott

    (Plymouth University)

  • Benjamin Dubarbier

    (CNRS, UMR EPOC 5805
    University of Bordeaux, UMR EPOC 5805)

Abstract

Rip currents are a leading cause of drowning on beaches worldwide. How bathers caught in a rip current should attempt to escape has been a subject of recent debate. A numerical model of human bathers escaping from a rip current flow field is applied to a 2-km-long section of the open beach of Biscarrosse, SW France. The study area comprises 4 rip channels that visually appear similar from the beach, but exhibit different morphologies. Simulations are run for 2 representative hazardous summer wave conditions. Results show that small changes in the bar/rip morphology have a large impact on the rip flow field, and in turn on the alongshore variability of the optimal rip current escape strategy. The overall flow regime (dominant surf-zone exits versus dominant recirculation), which is found to be influenced by the alongshore dimensions of the sand bars adjacent to the rip channel, is more important to rip current escape strategy than rip velocity. Flow regime was found to dictate the success of the “stay afloat” strategy, with greater success for recirculating flow. By comparison, the dominant longshore feeder current and rip-neck orientation determined the best direction to “swim parallel” towards. For obliquely incident waves, “swim parallel” downdrift then swim onshore with breaking waves was highly successful and can become a simple safety message for beach safety practitioners to communicate to the general public. However, in SW France where rip spacing is large ( $$\sim$$ ∼ 400 m), surf-zone eddies have large spatial scales of the order of 100+ m, requiring a large distance (100+ m) to swim to reach safety, therefore requiring good swimming ability. This also shows that in addition to rip current intensity, rip flow regime and the depth of adjacent sand bars, rip spacing is important for defining rip current hazard and the best safety message. Our results also indicate that for normal to near-normal wave incidence, rip current hazard and best rip current escape strategy are highly variable alongshore due to subtle differences in bar/rip morphology from one rip system to another. These findings challenge the objective of developing a universal rip current escape strategy message on open rip-channelled beaches exposed to normal to near-normal wave incidence, even for seemingly similar rip channels.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruno Castelle & R. Jak McCarroll & Robert W. Brander & Timothy Scott & Benjamin Dubarbier, 2016. "Modelling the alongshore variability of optimum rip current escape strategies on a multiple rip-channelled beach," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 81(1), pages 663-686, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:nathaz:v:81:y:2016:i:1:d:10.1007_s11069-015-2101-3
    DOI: 10.1007/s11069-015-2101-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. M. Miloshis & W. Stephenson, 2011. "Rip current escape strategies: lessons for swimmers and coastal rescue authorities," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 59(2), pages 823-832, November.
    2. Chris Houser & Gemma Barrett & Daniel Labude, 2011. "Alongshore variation in the rip current hazard at Pensacola Beach, Florida," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 57(2), pages 501-523, May.
    3. B. Brewster, 2010. "Rip current misunderstandings," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 55(2), pages 161-162, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Warton, Nicola M. & Brander, Robert W., 2017. "Improving tourist beach safety awareness: The benefits of watching Bondi Rescue," Tourism Management, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 187-200.

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