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A model of endogenous divorce and endogenous fertility


  • Chengze Simon Fan

    () (Department of Economics, Lingnan University, Tuen Mun, Hong Kong)


This paper examines the interaction between decisions on divorce and fertility. The analysis generates two major implications. Firstly, it complements the existing literature on endogenous fertility to explain why population growth and economic growth can be negatively correlated after an economy develops to a certain level. Secondly, it indicates that economic development leads to a simultaneous increase in divorce rates and decrease in fertility rates.

Suggested Citation

  • Chengze Simon Fan, 2001. "A model of endogenous divorce and endogenous fertility," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 14(1), pages 101-117.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:14:y:2001:i:1:p:101-117
    Note: Received: 05 February 1999/Accepted: 20 December 1999

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Del Boca, Daniela & Flinn, Christopher J, 1995. "Rationalizing Child-Support Decisions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1241-1262, December.
    2. Laurie J. Bassi & Robert I. Lerman, 1996. "Reducing the child support welfare disincentive problem," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(1), pages 89-96.
    3. Jennifer Roff, 2008. "A Stackelberg Model Of Child Support And Welfare," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 49(2), pages 515-546, May.
    4. Rocio Ribero & Daniela Del Boca, 2001. "The Effect of Child-Support Policies on Visitations and Transfers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 130-134, May.
    5. Weiss, Yoram & Willis, Robert J, 1993. "Transfers among Divorced Couples: Evidence and Interpretation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(4), pages 629-679, October.
    6. Chien-Chung Huang & James Kunz & Irwin Garfinkel, 2002. "The effect of child support on welfare exits and re-entries," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(4), pages 557-576.
    7. Weiss, Yoram & Willis, Robert J, 1985. "Children as Collective Goods and Divorce Settlements," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(3), pages 268-292, July.
    8. Chien-Chung Huang & Irwin Garfinkel & Jane Waldfogel, 2004. "Child Support Enforcement and Welfare Caseloads," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(1).
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    Cited by:

    1. Katie R. Genadek & Wendy A. Stock & Christiana Stoddard, 2007. "No-Fault Divorce Laws and the Labor Supply of Women with and without Children," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(1).
    2. Hemmi, Noriyoshi & Tabata, Ken & Futagami, Koichi, 2007. "The long-term care problem, precautionary saving, and economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 60-74, March.
    3. Dan Anderberg & Helmut Rainer & Kerstin Roeder, 2016. "Family-Specific Investments and Divorce: A Theory of Dynamically Inconsistent Household Behavior," CESifo Working Paper Series 5996, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Amanda Gosling & Maria D. C. Garcia-Alonso, 2015. "Endogenous divorce and human capital production," Studies in Economics 1521, School of Economics, University of Kent.

    More about this item


    Divorce · fertility · economic development;

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • O12 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Microeconomic Analyses of Economic Development


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