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Grouped zero-inflated count data models of coital frequency

Author

Listed:
  • Peter G. Moffatt

    () (School of Economic and Social Studies, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK)

  • Simon A. Peters

    () (School of Economic Studies, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, UK)

Abstract

Various count data models are applied to data collected from a sample of Norfolk young persons, who were asked how many times they had had sexual intercourse during the previous two-week period. The models take account of the fact that the data are "grouped", meaning that for some observations, the count is not known exactly but is known to fall in a particular range. Using a formal testing procedure, we find overwhelming evidence of the presence of excess zeros, and this we attribute to the fact that, at any time, a certain proportion of the population are sexually inactive. Our final model contains two equations, the first being the participation equation which determines whether an individual is sexually active, and the second being the frequency equation which determines the count, conditional on being active. Age, gender, salary, occupational status, marital status and type of living environment all have interesting effects on either participation or frequency. Since a significant proportion of the original sample declined to reveal coital frequency, we address the potential problem of selection bias by including a Heckman-type correction term during the model selection process.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter G. Moffatt & Simon A. Peters, 2000. "Grouped zero-inflated count data models of coital frequency," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 13(2), pages 205-220.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:13:y:2000:i:2:p:205-220
    Note: Received: 27 November 1998/Accepted: 19 May 1999
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Brown & Alan Duncan & Mark N. Harris & Jennifer Roberts & Karl Taylor, 2015. "A Zero-Inflated Regression Model for Grouped Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 77(6), pages 822-831, December.
    2. Fichera, Eleonora & Emsley, Richard & Sutton, Matt, 2016. "Is treatment “intensity” associated with healthier lifestyle choices? An application of the dose response function," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 149-163.
    3. David G. Blanchflower & Andrew J. Oswald, 2004. "Money, Sex and Happiness: An Empirical Study," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 106(3), pages 393-415, October.
    4. Page, Ian B. & Lichtenberg, Erik & Saavoss, Monica, 2015. "Estimating Recreation Demand When Survey Responses are Rounded," 2015 AAEA & WAEA Joint Annual Meeting, July 26-28, San Francisco, California 205653, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association;Western Agricultural Economics Association.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Grouped count data; Poisson regression; excess zeros; sample selection; coital frequency.;

    JEL classification:

    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions

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