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Learning-by-doing, population pressure, and the theory of demographic transition

Author

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  • Holger Strulik

    () (University of Hamburg, Department of Economics, Von Melle Park 5, D-20146 Hamburg, Germany)

Abstract

The present paper discusses the long-run effects of two interdependent relations between economic and population growth. According to a frequently used formulation of the population-push hypothesis, learning-by-doing effects in production lead to increasing returns to scale and, therefore, to a positive correlation between economic and population growth. In accordance to the theory of demographic transition the population growth rate initially increases with rising income levels and then declines. Regarding this relationship, the existence and stability of a low-income equilibrium and a high-income equilibrium will be shown in a neoclassical growth model. Under plausible conditions a demo-economic transition from the first to the second steady-state takes place. The result yields a meaningful interpretation of the population-push hypothesis, which is consistent with the empirical findings on the correlation between economic and population growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Holger Strulik, 1997. "Learning-by-doing, population pressure, and the theory of demographic transition," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(3), pages 285-298.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:10:y:1997:i:3:p:285-298
    Note: Received March 8, 1996 / Accepted October 24, 1996
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jacob L. Weisdorf, 2006. "From domestic manufacture to Industrial Revolution: long-run growth and agricultural development," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 264-287, April.
    2. Strulik, Holger & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2007. "The Simplest Unified Growth Theory," CEPR Discussion Papers 6528, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Boucekkine, Raouf & de la Croix, David & Licandro, Omar, 2002. "Vintage Human Capital, Demographic Trends, and Endogenous Growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 340-375, June.
    4. Holger Strulik, 2000. "On demographic transition, structural change, and economic growth and stagnation," Mathematical Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(4), pages 333-356.
    5. Jacob L. Weisdorf, 2004. "From stagnation to growth: Revisiting three historical regimes," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(3), pages 455-472, August.
    6. Michael Grimm, 2000. "Comportement familial, inégalités et croissance : Une revue de la littérature," Working Papers DT/2000/09, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    7. Holger Strulik & Siddiqui Sikandar, 2002. "Tracing the income-fertility nexus: Nonparametric Estimates for a Panel of Countries," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 15(5), pages 1-9.
    8. Luciano Fanti & Mimmo Iannelli & Piero Manfredi, 2010. "Endogenous Age Structure in Descriptive Macroeconomic Growth Models: A General Framework and Some Steady State Analysis," Chapters, in: Neri Salvadori (ed.), Institutional and Social Dynamics of Growth and Distribution, chapter 9, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    9. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:15:y:2002:i:5:p:1-9 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Holger Strulik & Jacob Weisdorf, 2008. "Population, food, and knowledge: a simple unified growth theory," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 195-216, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demographic transition · economic growth · population growth;

    JEL classification:

    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General

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