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Anticipating Nelson and Winter: Jack Downie's theory of evolutionary economic change

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  • John Nightingale

    () (Faculty of Commerce and Administration, Griffith University, Nathan, 4111, Australia An Evolutionary Theory of Economic Change, by Richard Nelson and Sidney Winter continues to have great influence on evolutionary economic thought. While their modeling techniques and the breadth of their vision for evolutionary theorising must be seen as seminal and effective innovation in economic theory, they were not the first inventors of such a theory. Close examination reveals that much of the economic theory was anticipated by Jack Downie whose book, The Competitive Process, was published in 1958. The extent of anticipation is remarkable, with not merely the two elements of population ecology, selection and mutation, but the way in which they are theorised to work being replicated by Nelson and Winter.)

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Suggested Citation

  • John Nightingale, 1997. "Anticipating Nelson and Winter: Jack Downie's theory of evolutionary economic change," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 7(2), pages 147-167.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:7:y:1997:i:2:p:147-167
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    Cited by:

    1. Brendan Markey-Towler, 2016. "Law of the jungle: firm survival and price dynamics in evolutionary markets," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 655-696, July.
    2. Geoffrey Hodgson & Kainan Huang, 2012. "Evolutionary game theory and evolutionary economics: are they different species?," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 345-366, April.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Evolutionary economics ; History of economic thought ; Population thinking ; Innovation;

    JEL classification:

    • B31 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought: Individuals - - - Individuals
    • L2 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior

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