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Used automobile protection and trade: Gravity and ordered probit analysis

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  • Danilo Pelletiere

    ()

  • Kenneth A. Reinert

    ()

Abstract

There is a great deal of protection against used automobile imports in many countries of the world that has gone largely unnoticed in the trade policy literature. Indeed, there has been no recent attempt to systematically analyze the determinants of used automobile trade and the role of protection in this trade. This paper makes a preliminary attempt, introducing an ordered measure of protection levels in 132 countries. A gravity model of used automobile exports from the United States shows that protection measures against used automobile import have a statistically-significant, suppressive effect on trade flows. An ordered probit analysis of the protection measures themselves points to new automobile production interests as a key factor behind used automobile protection. Other relevant explanatory factors of protection are income levels, democratic regime, transitional status, WTO membership, and income distribution. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2004

Suggested Citation

  • Danilo Pelletiere & Kenneth A. Reinert, 2004. "Used automobile protection and trade: Gravity and ordered probit analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 737-751, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:29:y:2004:i:4:p:737-751 DOI: 10.1007/s00181-004-0216-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Feng Dai & Songtao Wu & Ling Liang & Zifu Qin, 2016. "Bilateral Trade under Environmental Pressure: Balanced Growth," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 209-231, June.
    2. Sofronis Clerides, 2004. "Gains from Trade in Used Goods: Evidence from the Global Market for Automobiles," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 6-2004, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    3. BERTINELLI, Luisito & STROBL, Eric & ZOU, Benteng, 2006. "Polluting technologies and sustainable economic development," CORE Discussion Papers 2006052, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
    4. Clerides, Sofronis, 2008. "Gains from trade in used goods: Evidence from automobiles," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 76(2), pages 322-336, December.
    5. Lucas W. Davis & Matthew E. Kahn, 2010. "International Trade in Used Vehicles: The Environmental Consequences of NAFTA," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, pages 58-82.
    6. Kahouli, Bassem & Maktouf, Samir, 2015. "The determinants of FDI and the impact of the economic crisis on the implementation of RTAs: A static and dynamic gravity model," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 518-529.
    7. Lucas W. Davis & Matthew E. Kahn, 2008. "International Trade in Used Durable Goods: The Environmental Consequences of NAFTA," NBER Working Papers 14565, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Used goods; international trade; gravity model; ordered probit; F13; F17; C20; C25;

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F17 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Forecasting and Simulation
    • C20 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - General
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities

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