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Changes in black-white income inequality, 1968–78: A decade of progress?


  • William Darity
  • Samuel Myers


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  • William Darity & Samuel Myers, 1980. "Changes in black-white income inequality, 1968–78: A decade of progress?," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 10(4), pages 354-354, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:blkpoe:v:10:y:1980:i:4:p:354-354 DOI: 10.1007/BF02689713

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Richard Butler & James J. Heckman, 1977. "The Government's Impact on the Labor Market Status of Black Americans: A Critical Review," NBER Working Papers 0183, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. George J. Borjas & Richard B. Friedman & Lawrence F. Katz, 1997. "How Much Do Immigration and Trade Affect Labor Market Outcomes?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 28(1), pages 1-90.
    3. James P. Smith, 2004. "Race and Ethnicity in the Labor Market: Trends over the Short and Long Run," Labor and Demography 0402008, EconWPA.
    4. Betts, Julian, 1998. "Educational Crowding Out: Do Immigrants Affect the Educational Attainment of American Minorities?," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt8vt7f1bh, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
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    Cited by:

    1. Charles Brown, 1984. "Black-White Earnings Ratios Since the Civil Rights Act of 1964: The Importance of Labor Market Dropouts," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 99(1), pages 31-44.
    2. Price, Gregory N. & Darity Jr., William A. & Headen Jr., Alvin E., 2008. "Does the stigma of slavery explain the maltreatment of blacks by whites: The case of lynchings," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 167-193, February.
    3. Charles Betsey, 1992. "NEA Presidential Address: The role of race-conscious policies in addressing past and present discrimination," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 21(2), pages 5-35, December.

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