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The Case for a Temporary COVID-19 Income Tax Levy Now, During the Crisis

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  • Jonathan Karnon

    () (Flinders Health and Medical Research Institute)

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  • Jonathan Karnon, 2020. "The Case for a Temporary COVID-19 Income Tax Levy Now, During the Crisis," Applied Health Economics and Health Policy, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 335-337, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:aphecp:v:18:y:2020:i:3:d:10.1007_s40258-020-00585-6
    DOI: 10.1007/s40258-020-00585-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Bailey, Martin J & Olson, Mancur & Wonnacott, Paul, 1980. "The Marginal Utility of Income Does not Increase: Borrowing, Lending, and Friedman-Savage Gambles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 372-379, June.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Chris Sampson’s journal round-up for 1st June 2020
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2020-06-01 11:00:00

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