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Price regulation in a spatial duopoly with possible non-buyers


  • Jeroen Hinloopen

    () (University of Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics and Econometrics, Department of Economics, Roetersstraat 11, 1018 WB Amsterdam, The Netherlands , and Tinbergen Institute and Delft University of Technology)


If the price is regulated in a spatial duopoly where consumers have a finite upper bound as to the price they are willing to pay for the differentiated product, in most cases the Principle of Minimum Differentiation does not apply. Depending on the market structure firms either (i) form local monopolies, or (ii) differentiate intermediately, or (iii) agglomerate at the market centre. Minimum differentiation is never total-surplus-maximizing nor desired by firms. In most cases the regulator sets a price below that maximizing industry profits. For a substantial range of market configurations the regulated (first-best) price exceeds marginal cost. This induces firms to serve a larger part of the market.

Suggested Citation

  • Jeroen Hinloopen, 2002. "Price regulation in a spatial duopoly with possible non-buyers," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 36(1), pages 19-39.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:36:y:2002:i:1:p:19-39 Note: Received: February 1999/Accepted: September 2001

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    Cited by:

    1. Hinloopen, Jeroen & Müller, Wieland & Normann, Hans-Theo, 2014. "Output commitment through product bundling: Experimental evidence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 164-180.
    2. Hinloopen, Jeroen & Martin, Stephen, 2017. "Costly location in Hotelling duopoly," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 118-128.
    3. Kurt R. Brekke & Robert Nuscheler & Odd Rune Straume, 2006. "Quality and Location Choices under Price Regulation," Journal of Economics & Management Strategy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 15(1), pages 207-227, March.
    4. Sallstrom Matthews, S.E., 2007. "The Principle of Moderate Differentiation," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0720, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D43 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Oligopoly and Other Forms of Market Imperfection
    • L13 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Oligopoly and Other Imperfect Markets


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