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The Analysis of Personal Taxation and Social Security

Author

Listed:
  • A.B. Atkinson

    (International Centre for Economics and Related Disciplines. London School of Economics)

  • M.A. King

    (University of Birmingham)

  • H. Sutherland

    (International Centre for Economics and Related Disciplines. London School of Economics)

Abstract

This article describes research on the analysis of the consequences of changes in personal taxation and social security carried out as part of the SSRC Programme on Taxation, Incentives and the Distribution of Income. It shows how data from the Family Expenditure Survey can be used to see who gains and who loses from policy changes, illustrating this by an examination of proposals for a tax credit scheme. It discusses the incorporation of changes in behaviour, and the effect of taxes and benefits on incentives, including the 'poverty trap'. Particular emphasis is placed on the accessibility of the analysis, and the last section describes a range of programs which are available for use on micro-computers.

Suggested Citation

  • A.B. Atkinson & M.A. King & H. Sutherland, 1983. "The Analysis of Personal Taxation and Social Security," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 106(1), pages 63-74, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:niesru:v:106:y:1983:i:1:p:63-74
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hiau LooiKee & Alessandro Nicita & Marcelo Olarreaga, 2009. "Estimating Trade Restrictiveness Indices," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 119(534), pages 172-199, January.
    2. Henry G. Overman & L. Alan Winters, 2011. "Trade And Economic Geography: The Impact Of Eec Accession On The Uk," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 79(5), pages 994-1017, September.
    3. Marcel P. Timmer & Erik Dietzenbacher & Bart Los & Robert Stehrer & Gaaitzen J. Vries, 2015. "An Illustrated User Guide to the World Input–Output Database: the Case of Global Automotive Production," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(3), pages 575-605, August.
    4. Sascha O Becker & Thiemo Fetzer & Dennis Novy, 2017. "Who voted for Brexit? A comprehensive district-level analysis," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 32(92), pages 601-650.
    5. Monique Ebell & James Warren, 2016. "The Long-Term Economic Impact of Leaving the EU," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 236(1), pages 121-138, May.
    6. Henry G Overman & L Alan Winters, 2005. "The port geography of UK international trade," Environment and Planning A, Pion Ltd, London, vol. 37(10), pages 1751-1768, October.
    7. Swati Dhingra & Stephen Machin & Henry Overman, 2017. "Local Economic Effects of Brexit," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 242(1), pages 24-36, November.
    8. repec:cep:cepbxt:10 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Ebell, Monique & Hurst, Ian & Warren, James, 2016. "Modelling the long-run economic impact of leaving the European Union," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 196-209.
    10. Lorenzo Caliendo & Fernando Parro, 2015. "Estimates of the Trade and Welfare Effects of NAFTA," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(1), pages 1-44.
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    Cited by:

    1. Rolf Aaberge & François Bourguignon & Andrea Brandolini & Francisco H. G. Ferreira & Janet C. Gornick & John Hills & Markus Jäntti & Stephen P. Jenkins & Eric Marlier & John Micklewright & Brian Nolan, 2017. "Tony Atkinson and his Legacy," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 63(3), pages 411-444, September.
    2. Figari, Francesco & Paulus, Alari & Sutherland, Holly, 2014. "Microsimulation and policy analysis," ISER Working Paper Series 2014-23, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Burlacu, Irina S. & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2012. "Differential Welfare State Impacts for Frontier Working Age Families," IZA Discussion Papers 6734, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Lietz, Christine & Mantovani, Daniela, 2006. "Lessons from building and using EUROMOD," EUROMOD Working Papers EM5/06, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. repec:kap:jecinq:v:15:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10888-017-9370-x is not listed on IDEAS

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