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Armed Conflict, 1946-2010

Author

Listed:
  • Lotta Themnér

    () (Uppsala Conflict Data Program)

  • Peter Wallensteen

    (Uppsala Conflict Data Program)

Abstract

In 2010, UCDP recorded 30 active armed conflicts (i.e. with a minimum of 25 battle-related deaths). This is a substantial reduction in relation to the 36 conflicts registered for 2009. A drop of this magnitude has only been reported four times previously in the post-1946 period. However, only in two of these instances was this part of a general downward trend. Thus no major inferences should be drawn, except perhaps that the reduction in conflicts in Africa seems to be part of a trend. At 30 in 2010, the number of active conflicts is at its lowest level since 2003. Furthermore, the number of wars (1,000 or more battle-related deaths) declined from six in 2009 to four in 2010. The most intense war in terms of fatalities was in Afghanistan. Eight of the armed conflicts listed for 2009 were not active in 2010, but during the year two new conflicts erupted - Mauritania and Tajikistan - both involving rebel groups that had previously fought in neighbouring countries. Only two peace agreements were concluded during the year. While this is one more than 2009, it is decidedly below the annual average for the post-Cold War period.

Suggested Citation

  • Lotta Themnér & Peter Wallensteen, 2011. "Armed Conflict, 1946-2010," Journal of Peace Research, Peace Research Institute Oslo, vol. 48(4), pages 525-536, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:joupea:v:48:y:2011:i:4:p:525-536
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Janus, Thorsten & Riera-Crichton, Daniel, 2015. "Economic shocks, civil war and ethnicity," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 32-44.
    2. Patricia Justino, 2012. "Shared Societies and Armed Conflict: Costs, Inequality and the Benefits of Peace," HiCN Working Papers 125, Households in Conflict Network.
    3. Patricia Justino & Ivan Cardona & Rebecca Mitchell & Catherine Müller, 2012. "Quantifying the Impact of Women’s Participation in Post-Conflict Economic Recovery," HiCN Working Papers 131, Households in Conflict Network.
    4. Chowdhury Abdur R. & Murshed Syed Mansoob, 2013. "A Note on War and Fiscal Capacity in Developing Countries," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 19(3), pages 431-435, December.
    5. Patricia Justino, 2012. "Nutrition, Governance and Violence: A Framework for the Analysis of Resilience and Vulnerability to Food Insecurity in Contexts of Violent Conflict," HiCN Working Papers 132, Households in Conflict Network.
    6. Maystadt, Jean-François & Trinh Tan, Jean-François & Breisinger, Clemens, 2014. "Does food security matter for transition in Arab countries?," Food Policy, Elsevier, pages 106-115.
    7. Elu Juliet U. & Price Gregory N., 2012. "Remittances and the Financing of Terrorism In Sub-Saharan Africa: 1974 - 2006," Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 18(1), pages 1-42, July.
    8. Rigterink, Anouk S., 2012. "New Wars in Numbers. An exploration of various datasets on intra-state violence," MPRA Paper 45264, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Amanda Murdie, 2014. "Scrambling for contact: The determinants of inter-NGO cooperation in non-Western countries," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, pages 309-331.
    10. repec:hrv:faseco:30410811 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Ole Theisen & Nils Gleditsch & Halvard Buhaug, 2013. "Is climate change a driver of armed conflict?," Climatic Change, Springer, vol. 117(3), pages 613-625, April.

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    Keywords

    conflict; data; dyad; peace agreement; war;

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