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Is Workers' Compensation Covering Uninsured Medical Costs? Evidence from the “Monday Effectâ€

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  • David Card
  • Brian P. McCall

Abstract

Steady increases in the cost of medical care, coupled with a rise in the fraction of workers who lack medical insurance, create incentives for workers who are injured off-the-job to file Workers' Compensation claims. Many analysts have interpreted the high rate of Monday injuries—especially hard-to-monitor injuries like back strains—as evidence of such claims. The analysis in this paper, however, which uses data on “first reports†of injuries filed with the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry between 1985 and 1989, indicates that workers with low probabilities of medical coverage are no more likely to report a Monday injury than are other workers. Moreover, employers are no more likely to challenge the Monday injury claims of workers with low medical coverage rates than the claims filed by workers with high coverage rates.

Suggested Citation

  • David Card & Brian P. McCall, 1996. "Is Workers' Compensation Covering Uninsured Medical Costs? Evidence from the “Monday Effectâ€," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(4), pages 690-706, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:49:y:1996:i:4:p:690-706
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    Cited by:

    1. Darius N Lakdawalla & Robert T Reville & Seth A Seabury, 2007. "How Does Health Insurance Affect Workers' Compensation Filing?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(2), pages 286-303, April.
    2. Guido W. Imbens & Jeffrey M. Wooldridge, 2009. "Recent Developments in the Econometrics of Program Evaluation," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(1), pages 5-86, March.
    3. Dillender, Marcus, 2015. "The effect of health insurance on workers’ compensation filing: Evidence from the affordable care act's age-based threshold for dependent coverage," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 204-228.
    4. Stijn Viaene & Guido Dedene, 2004. "Insurance Fraud: Issues and Challenges," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance - Issues and Practice, Palgrave Macmillan;The Geneva Association, vol. 29(2), pages 313-333, April.
    5. Krueger, Alan B. & Meyer, Bruce D., 2002. "Labor supply effects of social insurance," Handbook of Public Economics,in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 33, pages 2327-2392 Elsevier.
    6. Joshua K. Hausman, 2016. "Fiscal Policy and Economic Recovery: The Case of the 1936 Veterans' Bonus," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(4), pages 1100-1143, April.

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