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Utilities, Land-Use Change, and Urban Development: Brownfield Sites as ‘Cold-Spots’ of Infrastructure Networks in Berlin

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  • Timothy Moss

    (Institut für Regionalentwicklung und Strukturplanung/Institute for Regional Development and Structural Planning (IRS), Flakenstraße 28-31, D 15537 Erkner bei Berlin, Germany)

Abstract

This paper explores the interrelationships between urban land use, resource consumption, and utility service provision with a study of brownfield regeneration—from an infrastructure perspective. Drawing on recent research into the spatial strategies of utility companies, after liberalisation and privatisation, I identify disused industrial sites as ‘cold-spots’ of infrastructure systems where energy and water consumption has recently collapsed. Using a case study of Berlin I analyse first the challenges facing the city's three major utilities as a result of shifting patterns of resource consumption and overcapacity in parts of their networks. In the second part I examine the responses of the three utilities to these challenges in the context of recent institutional changes to infrastructure provision; exploring how the utilities are moving towards greater spatial differentiation in their network management and what interest they have in brownfield regeneration.

Suggested Citation

  • Timothy Moss, 2003. "Utilities, Land-Use Change, and Urban Development: Brownfield Sites as ‘Cold-Spots’ of Infrastructure Networks in Berlin," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 35(3), pages 511-529, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:envira:v:35:y:2003:i:3:p:511-529
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    Cited by:

    1. Timothy Moss, 2008. "‘Cold spots’ of Urban Infrastructure: ‘Shrinking’ Processes in Eastern Germany and the Modern Infrastructural Ideal," International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(2), pages 436-451, June.
    2. Navratil, Josef & Picha, Kamil & Martinat, Stanislav & Nathanail, Paul C. & Tureckova, Kamila & Holesinska, Andrea, 2018. "Resident’s preferences for urban brownfield revitalization: Insights from two Czech cities," Land Use Policy, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 224-234.
    3. Phipps, Alan G., 2008. "Reuses of closed schools in Windsor, Ontario," Socio-Economic Planning Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 18-30, March.

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