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Peakload electricity demand in Kuwait




This paper examines demand for electricity in Kuwait. As, given the climatic conditions, the planning for electricity generating capacity is based on peak-load, the main focus of the paper is peak-load demand. The analysis in the paper is based on annual time series data, and generalized least square procedure is used to estimate the demand model. The model takes account of some of the key features of Kuwait’s electricity consumption patterns, e.g., unchanged nominal price for electricity, non-payment of electricity bills, air-conditioning load, etc. The estimated model was used to project future electricity demand under alternative scenarios and determine future capacity requirements.

Suggested Citation

  • Al-Enezi, Mohammed & Burney, Nadeem A. & Hamada, Salwa & Awadh, Wafa, 2007. "Peakload electricity demand in Kuwait," Economia Internazionale / International Economics, Camera di Commercio Industria Artigianato Agricoltura di Genova, vol. 60(3), pages 273-291.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:ecoint:0051

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Ramadhan, Mohammad & Naseeb, Adel, 2011. "The cost benefit analysis of implementing photovoltaic solar system in the state of Kuwait," Renewable Energy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 1272-1276.

    More about this item


    Electricity Demand; Peak-load; Capacity Requirements; Future Projections; Kuwait;

    JEL classification:

    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis
    • Q41 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Demand and Supply; Prices


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