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Productivity Growth: A New Era?


  • James A. Kahn

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)

  • Kevin Stiroh

    (Federal Reserve Bank of New York)


On November 2, 2001, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and the Review of Economic Dynamics organized a conference on productivity growth aiming to better understand what has occured over the past five to ten years in the area of technological progress, and what is likely to transpire in the decade to come. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • James A. Kahn & Kevin Stiroh, 2002. "Productivity Growth: A New Era?," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 5(2), pages 237-242, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:v:5:y:2002:i:2:p:237-242
    DOI: 10.1006/redy.2002.0161

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rogerson, Richard, 1988. "Indivisible labor, lotteries and equilibrium," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 3-16, January.
    2. Hansen, Gary D., 1985. "Indivisible labor and the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 309-327, November.
    3. Anil K. Kashyap & Jeremy C. Stein, 1994. "Monetary Policy and Bank Lending," NBER Chapters,in: Monetary Policy, pages 221-261 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Ogawa, Kazuo & Suzuki, Kazuyuki, 1998. "Land Value and Corporate Investment: Evidence from Japanese Panel Data," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 232-249, September.
    5. Takeo Hoshi & Anil Kashyap, 2000. "The Japanese Banking Crisis: Where Did It Come From and How Will It End?," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1999, Volume 14, pages 129-212 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dale W. Jorgenson & Mun S. Ho & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2004. "Will the U.S. productivity resurgence continue?," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 10(Dec).
    2. Theo Eicher & Oliver Röhn, 2007. "Sources of the German Productivity Demise – Tracing the Effects of Industry-Level ICT Investment," CESifo Working Paper Series 1896, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Barry P. Bosworth & Jack E. Triplett, 2007. "The Early 21st Century U.S. Productivity Expansion is Still in Services," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 14, pages 3-19, Spring.

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