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Multifunctional Aspects of Italian Agriculture: Evidence from the Latest Census


  • Roberto Henke
  • Andrea Povellato
  • Francesco Vanni


The article provides an analysis of the multifunctionality of Italian agriculture based on the data of the 6th Agricultural Census (Istat). Exploring the new functions assigned to agriculture according to the post-productivist model of development, the paper focuses on two issues closely interconnected: the provision of environmental public goods and the diversification of activities carried out by the agricultural holdings. While Italian agriculture seems to be particularly suited for the provision of environmental goods and services, the data show a rather limited capacity on the part of Italian farms to introduce new diversification activities. Overall, the picture emerging from the analysis shows the coexistence in Italian agriculture of different production models. In some the multifunctional role of agriculture is key, since they are firmly based on the new environmental functions and the profitable diversification activities that are complementary or alternative to agricultural production.

Suggested Citation

  • Roberto Henke & Andrea Povellato & Francesco Vanni, 2014. "Multifunctional Aspects of Italian Agriculture: Evidence from the Latest Census," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 1, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:rar:journl:0278

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Hoekman, Bernard & Martin, Will & Mattoo, Aaditya, 2010. "Conclude Doha: it matters!," World Trade Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 9(03), pages 505-530, July.
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    7. Alan Matthews, 2012. "The Impact of WTO Agricultural Trade Rules on Food Security and Development: An Examination of Proposed Additional Flexibilities for Developing Countries," Chapters,in: Research Handbook on the WTO Agriculture Agreement, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    8. Will Martin & Aaditya Mattoo, 2010. "The Doha Development Agenda: What's on the table?," The Journal of International Trade & Economic Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(1), pages 81-107.
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    More about this item


    Multifunctionality; Agricultural census; Income diversification; Environmental public goods;

    JEL classification:

    • H41 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Public Goods
    • Q12 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Micro Analysis of Farm Firms, Farm Households, and Farm Input Markets
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment


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