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A Sustainability Perspective on Flexible HRM: How to Cope with Paradoxes of Contingent Work

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  • Kozica, Arjan
  • Kaiser, Stephan

Abstract

Based on a sustainability perspective we offer a research framework that allows discussion of the relationship between positive and negative effects of flexible HRM. Sustainability, as an umbrella concept, aims to integrate three perspectives: economy, ecology and society. The relationships between these perspectives are characterized by paradoxical tensions. Following Ehnerts’ approach of “Sustainable HRM”, we use coping strategies from paradox theory in order to discuss paradoxical tensions within research findings on flexible HRM. We conclude that the adapted usage of Sustainable HRM offers a starting point for more sophisticated research into the relationship between the positive and negative effects of flexible HRM.

Suggested Citation

  • Kozica, Arjan & Kaiser, Stephan, 2012. "A Sustainability Perspective on Flexible HRM: How to Cope with Paradoxes of Contingent Work," management revue. Socio-economic Studies, Rainer Hampp Verlag, vol. 23(3), pages 239-261.
  • Handle: RePEc:rai:mamere:1861-9908_mrev_2012_3_kozica
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    flexible HRM; flexibility; Sustainable HRM; sustainability;

    JEL classification:

    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation
    • M14 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Corporate Culture; Diversity; Social Responsibility
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J50 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - General

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