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Linking Development and Innovation: What Does Technological Change Bring to the Society?


  • Evgeny A Klochikhin

    (1] Manchester Institute of Innovation Research, Manchester Business School, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK[2] Moscow State Institute of International Relations (MGIMO-University) of MFA of Russia, Moscow, Russia)


Recently, there has been a popular trend in academic research for paying more attention to ‘pro-poor’ policies and theoretical studies. This tradition has emerged from a broader understanding of development that includes not only economic but also social and political dimensions. Meanwhile, innovation researchers are still considering development as mere economic growth without much focus on the social impacts of technological change. This article recognizes that, despite these fundamental differences, the concepts of innovation and development have much in common and are, in fact, positively connected and mutually beneficial. This assumption has some important implications for the innovation and development of policy-making process. The article concludes by arguing that the new cross-disciplinary approach is required in order to answer the questions posed here in a more meticulous way.Un courant populaire s’est récemment développé dans la recherche universitaire et plaide pour que davantage d’attention soit portée aux politiques et études théoriques ‘pro-pauvres’. Ce mouvement provient d’une perspective nouvelle et plus large sur le développement, prenant en compte les dimensions non seulement économiques mais aussi sociales et politiques. Dans le même temps, les chercheurs en innovation semblent continuer à ne voir dans le développement que la croissance économique, sans s’intéresser aux impacts sociaux du changement technologique. Cet article reconnaît que malgré ces différences fondamentales les concepts d’innovation et de développement ont beaucoup en commun et sont en fait positivement corrélés et complémentaires. Cette supposition comporte quelques implications importantes pour le processus d’élaboration de politiques d’innovation et de développement. L’article conclut en soutenant que la nouvelle approche inter-disciplinaire est peut être nécessaire pour pouvoir répondre de manière plus détaillée aux questions soulevées ici.

Suggested Citation

  • Evgeny A Klochikhin, 2012. "Linking Development and Innovation: What Does Technological Change Bring to the Society?," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 24(1), pages 41-55, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:pal:eurjdr:v:24:y:2012:i:1:p:41-55

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    References listed on IDEAS

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