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CEO Investment Cycles

Author

Listed:
  • Yihui Pan
  • Tracy Yue Wang
  • Michael S. Weisbach

Abstract

This paper documents the existence of a CEO investment cycle, in which disinvestment decreases over a CEO's tenure, while investment increases, leading to “cyclical” firm growth in assets and employment. The estimated variation in investment rate over the CEO investment cycle is of the same order of magnitude as the differences caused by business cycles or financial constraints. Results from a number of tests generally support the view that the investment cycle is caused by agency problems, leading to increasing investment quantity and decreasing investment quality over time as the CEO gains more control over his board.Received February 17, 2015; accepted October 1, 2015 by Editor David Denis.

Suggested Citation

  • Yihui Pan & Tracy Yue Wang & Michael S. Weisbach, 2016. "CEO Investment Cycles," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 29(11), pages 2955-2999.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:29:y:2016:i:11:p:2955-2999.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/rfs/hhw033
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Limbach, Peter & Schmid, Markus & Scholz, Meik, 2015. "Do CEOs Matter? Corporate Performance and the CEO Life Cycle," Working Papers on Finance 1511, University of St. Gallen, School of Finance, revised Apr 2016.
    2. Cziraki, Peter & Xu, Moqi, 2014. "CEO job security and risk-taking," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 55909, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. repec:eee:corfin:v:47:y:2017:i:c:p:88-109 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ang, James & de Jong, Abe & van der Poel, Marieke, 2014. "Does familiarity with business segments affect CEOs' divestment decisions?," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 58-74.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G32 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Financing Policy; Financial Risk and Risk Management; Capital and Ownership Structure; Value of Firms; Goodwill
    • G34 - Financial Economics - - Corporate Finance and Governance - - - Mergers; Acquisitions; Restructuring; Corporate Governance
    • M12 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - Personnel Management; Executives; Executive Compensation
    • M51 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Personnel Economics - - - Firm Employment Decisions; Promotions

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