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Regulating Access to International Large-Value Payment Systems

Author

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  • Cornelia Holthausen
  • Thomas R¯nde

Abstract

This article studies access regulation to international large-value payment systems when banking supervision is national. We focus on the choice between net and real-time gross settlement. As a novel feature, the communication between the public authorities is endogenized. It is shown that the national authorities' incentives are not perfectly aligned concerning the settlement method. Therefore public regulation fails to implement the first-best access criteria. Banks prefer net settlement too often due to limited liability. Still, if banks have superior information about their counterparties, private involvement in access regulation is desirable as it reveals information to the public authorities. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Cornelia Holthausen & Thomas R¯nde, 2002. "Regulating Access to International Large-Value Payment Systems," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(5), pages 1561-1586.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:15:y:2002:i:5:p:1561-1586
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bruce J. Summers, 1991. "Clearing and payment systems: the role of the central bank," Federal Reserve Bulletin, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.), issue Feb, pages 81-91.
    2. De Bandt, Olivier & Hartmann, Philipp, 2000. "Systemic risk: A survey," Working Paper Series 0035, European Central Bank.
    3. Kahn, Charles M & Roberds, William, 1998. "Payment System Settlement and Bank Incentives," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 11(4), pages 845-870.
    4. Freixas, Xavier & Parigi, Bruno, 1998. "Contagion and Efficiency in Gross and Net Interbank Payment Systems," Journal of Financial Intermediation, Elsevier, vol. 7(1), pages 3-31, January.
    5. Nahum D. Melumad & Toshiyuki Shibano, 1991. "Communication in Settings with No. Transfers," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 22(2), pages 173-198, Summer.
    6. Crawford, Vincent P & Sobel, Joel, 1982. "Strategic Information Transmission," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(6), pages 1431-1451, November.
    7. Stein, Jeremy C, 1989. "Cheap Talk and the Fed: A Theory of Imprecise Policy Announcements," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 32-42, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. De Bandt, Olivier & Hartmann, Philipp, 2000. "Systemic risk: A survey," Working Paper Series 0035, European Central Bank.
    2. Holthausen, Cornelia & Rochet, Jean-Charles, 2006. "Efficient Pricing of Large Value Interbank Payment Systems," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(7), pages 1797-1818, October.
    3. Cornelia Holthausen & Thomas Rønde, 2003. "Cooperation in International Banking Supervision," CIE Discussion Papers 2004-02, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics. Centre for Industrial Economics.
    4. Charles M. Kahn & William Roberds, 2002. "Payments settlement under limited enforcement: Private versus public systems," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2002-33, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    5. Jonathan Chiu & Alexandra Lai, 2007. "Modelling Payments Systems: A Review of the Literature," Staff Working Papers 07-28, Bank of Canada.
    6. Simona MUTU, 2015. "Exposure To Systemic Risk Of The European Too-Big-To-Fail Banks During Crisis," Review of Economic and Business Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, issue 16, pages 103-115, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General
    • G28 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Government Policy and Regulation

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