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Does the Limit Order Routing Decision Matter?

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  • Robert Battalio
  • Jason Greene
  • Brian Hatch

Abstract

We examine the impact deciding to route limit orders away from the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) has on three dimensions of execution quality with methodologies controlling for market conditions and order submission strategies. Overall differences in limit order execution quality between regional stock exchanges and the NYSE are small, suggesting that the order routing decision may not affect retail limit order traders substantively. Conditioning on the distance between the limit order's price and prevailing quotes, however, reveals systematic differences in execution quality. This implies that brokers can strategically route limit orders to improve retail limit order execution quality. Copyright 2002, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert Battalio & Jason Greene & Brian Hatch, 2002. "Does the Limit Order Routing Decision Matter?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(1), pages 159-194, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:15:y:2002:i:1:p:159-194
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    Cited by:

    1. Bacidore, Jeffrey & Ross, Katharine & Sofianos, George, 2003. "Quantifying market order execution quality at the New York stock exchange," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 6(3), pages 281-307, May.
    2. Bidisha Chakrabarty & Zhaohui Han & Konstantin Tyurin & Xiaoyong Zheng, 2006. "A Competing Risk Analysis of Executions and Cancellations in a Limit Order Market," Caepr Working Papers 2006-015, Center for Applied Economics and Policy Research, Economics Department, Indiana University Bloomington.
    3. Battalio, Robert & Hatch, Brian & Jennings, Robert, 2003. "All else equal?: a multidimensional analysis of retail, market order execution quality," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 143-162, April.
    4. Benston, George J. & Wood, Robert A., 2008. "Why effective spreads on NASDAQ were higher than on the New York stock exchange in the 1990s," Journal of Empirical Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 17-40, January.

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