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Spatial and Temporal Changes in the U.S. Hog, Dairy, and Fed-Cattle Sectors, 1975–2000

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  • Deepananda P. Herath
  • Alfons J. Weersink
  • Chantal L. Carpentier

Abstract

The hog, dairy, and fed-cattle sectors have become more geographically concentrated within states across the country. Hog and dairy inventories increased in nontraditional production regions but fed-cattle inventories increased only in the three major producing states. Regions in the northeastern quadrant of the United States tended to experience an attrition pattern of geographical concentration in livestock production. In contrast, an augmentation pattern is evident in the western regions where absolute inventory numbers increased along with geographical concentration. The patterns are most closely associated with changes in regional processing capacity. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Deepananda P. Herath & Alfons J. Weersink & Chantal L. Carpentier, 2005. "Spatial and Temporal Changes in the U.S. Hog, Dairy, and Fed-Cattle Sectors, 1975–2000," Review of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 27(1), pages 49-69.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:revage:v:27:y:2005:i:1:p:49-69
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/j.1467-9353.2004.00207.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Azzeddine Azzam & Gibson Nene & Karina Schoengold, 2015. "Hog Industry Structure and the Stringency of Environmental Regulation," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 63(3), pages 333-358, September.
    2. Arens, Ludwig & Thulke, Hans-Hermann & Eisinger, Dirk & Theuvsen, Ludwig, 2012. "Administrative cooperation and disease control in cross-border pork production," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 473-482.
    3. Fertő, Imre & Csonka, Arnold, 2017. "Válság- és agglomerációs hatások a magyarországi sertéstartásban
      [Crisis and agglomeration in Hungary s pig production]
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(2), pages 105-122.
    4. Predrag Rajsic & Glenn Fox, 2016. "Environmental Externalities, Comparative Advantage, and the Location of Production: An Application to the Canadian Dairy Industry," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 64(2), pages 311-337, June.
    5. Abay Mulatu & Ada Wossink, 2014. "Environmental Regulation and Location of Industrialized Agricultural Production in Europe," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 90(3), pages 509-537.
    6. Nene, Gibson & Azzam, Azzeddine M. & Schoengold, Karina, 2009. "Environmental Regulations and the Structure of U.S. Hog Farms," 2009 Annual Meeting, July 26-28, 2009, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 49395, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Csonka, Arnold & Fertő, Imre, 2016. "Crisis and Agglomeration in the Hungarian Hog Sector," 149th Seminar, October 27-28, 2016, Rennes, France 244787, European Association of Agricultural Economists.

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