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Is Fiscal Policy Poised for a Comeback?

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  • Paul Krugman

Abstract

For several decades, discretionary fiscal policy has been in disrepute. Most economists viewed it as unnecessary, because monetary policy was up to the job of stabilizing the economy. Economists also viewed fiscal policy as too clumsy to deal with the relatively short recessions that became the post-war norm. But the experience of Japan and the near-Japan experience of the United States in 2001--3 have renewed some of the old case for fiscal policy. Low-interest environments in which monetary policy becomes ineffective turn out to be a real danger, not a myth. Economic slumps that last for a number of years, offering ample time to implement fiscal expansion, also turn out to be possible. As a result, the case for fiscal policy made by the first generation of Keynesians has experienced a real revival. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Paul Krugman, 2005. "Is Fiscal Policy Poised for a Comeback?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(4), pages 515-523, Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxford:v:21:y:2005:i:4:p:515-523
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    Cited by:

    1. Theodore T. Koutsobinas, 2011. "From Monetary to Fiscal Policy Rule: A Matter of Adjustment or Choice?," Chapters,in: Credit, Money and Macroeconomic Policy, chapter 4 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Brittle, Shane, 2009. "Ricardian Equivalence and the Efficacy of Fiscal Policy in Australia," Economics Working Papers wp09-10, School of Economics, University of Wollongong, NSW, Australia.
    3. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Yannis Psycharis & Vassilis Tselios, 2012. "Public investment and regional growth and convergence: Evidence from Greece," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, pages 543-568.
    4. Kamal, Mona, 2015. "Egypt Relative to the COMESA’s Member States: Do Fiscal Policy Rules Matter?," MPRA Paper 67101, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Ricardo Ffrench-Davis, 2008. "From “Financieristic” to Real Macroeconomics," Ensayos Económicos, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department, vol. 1(52), pages 7-37, October -.
    6. Bowen, Alex & Stern, Nicholas, 2010. "Environmental policy and the economic downturn," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 37589, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    7. Pavlina R. Tcherneva, 2008. "The Return of Fiscal Policy: Can the New Developments in the New Economic Consensus Be Reconciled with the Post-Keynesian View?," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_539, Levy Economics Institute.
    8. Canale, Rosaria Rita & Napolitano, Oreste, 2009. "The recessive attitude of EMU policies: reflections on the italian experience, 1998–2008," MPRA Paper 20207, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Kristina Spantig, 2013. "Keynesian Dominance in Crisis Therapy," Global Financial Markets Working Paper Series 45-2013, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    10. Ricardo Ffrench-Davis, 2008. "From Financieristic To Real Macroeconomics: Seeking Development Convergence In Ees," Working Papers wp272, University of Chile, Department of Economics.
    11. Canale Rosaria Rita & Foresti Pasquale & Marani Ugo & Napolitano Oreste, 2008. "On keynesian effects of (apparent) non-keynesian fiscal policies," Politica economica, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 5-46.

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