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Aid Effectiveness in Africa: The Unfinished Agenda

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  • Lancaster, Carol

Abstract

Africa is the world's most aided major region. Yet economic growth has been disappointingly low there. A number of factors explain the poor outcomes and limited sustainability of and in Africa. But the organisation and management of the aid relationship is a particularly important one, including the dependence of Africans on that aid. The currently popular nostrums for solving the problem of the effectiveness in Africa--selectivity, ownership, sector investment programme and more aid--are as yet inadequate and often contradictory. Much more work and honest debate needs to occur before the problem of aid effectiveness can be tackled in Africa. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Lancaster, Carol, 1999. "Aid Effectiveness in Africa: The Unfinished Agenda," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 8(4), pages 487-503, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:8:y:1999:i:4:p:487-503
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Dustmann, Christian & Kirchkamp, Oliver, 2002. "The optimal migration duration and activity choice after re-migration," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 351-372, April.
    2. Rapoport, Hillel & Docquier, Frederic, 2006. "The Economics of Migrants' Remittances," Handbook on the Economics of Giving, Reciprocity and Altruism, Elsevier.
    3. Galor, Oded & Stark, Oded, 1991. "The probability of return migration, migrants' work effort, and migrants' performance," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 399-405, April.
    4. Djajic, Slobodan, 1986. "International migration, remittances and welfare in a dependent economy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 21(2), pages 229-234, May.
    5. Edgard R. Rodriguez & Susan Horton, 1995. "International Return Migration and Remittances in the Philippines," Working Papers horton-95-01, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
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    Cited by:

    1. Bhaumik, Sumon Kumar, 2005. "Does the World Bank have any impact on human development of the poorest countries? Some preliminary evidence from Africa," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 422-432, December.
    2. Axel Dreher, 2009. "IMF conditionality: theory and evidence," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 141(1), pages 233-267, October.
    3. Gómez-Echeverri, Luis, 2013. "Foreign Aid and Sustainable Energy," WIDER Working Paper Series 093, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    4. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2012-69 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Leonid V. Azarnert, 2009. "Foreign Aid, Fertility and Population Growth:Evidence from Africa," Working Papers 2009-12, Bar-Ilan University, Department of Economics.
    6. Acharya, Arnab & Martínez-Álvarez, Melisa, 2012. "Aid Effectiveness in the Health Sector," WIDER Working Paper Series 069, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    7. Omotunde E.G. JOHNSON, 2005. "Country Ownership Of Reform Programmes And The Implications For Conditionality," G-24 Discussion Papers 35, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    8. repec:zag:zirebs:v:20:y:2017:i:1:p:101-112 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. repec:ers:ijebaa:v:iv:y:2016:i:4:p:64-72 is not listed on IDEAS

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